EVOLVE is the Annual Fundraiser at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago

The Field Museum Muses

Neoclassical Inspiration: The Erechtheum and other Grecian and Roman Temple

See more images of the Grecian elements of the Field Museum’s architecture.

Botany, Low Relief Panel by Henry Hering, Winged female figure holding plants, fruits and flowers.

Geology, Low Relief Panel by Henry Hering, Winged female figure holding a globe with North and South American continents and a torch representing fire. 

Zoology, Low Relief Panel by Henry Hering, Winged female figure holding a horned animal skull. 

The Muses

Located at each corner of Stanley Field Hall, the four muses depict the purposes for which The Field Museum was founded.

© The Field Museum, CSGN40272© The Field Museum, CSGN40270

 

EVOLVE is the premier annual fundraiser at the Field Museum.

Each year hundreds of young professionals flock to Stanley Field Hall for cocktails and food.

WHEN: Saturday, October 22nd

Founded in 1983 as the Columbian Museum of Chicago, the Field Museum is home to Sue, the largest, most complete, and best preserved Tyrannosaurus rex fossil yet discovered.
Come see the legendary Lions of Tsavo, who killed more nearly 140 people in Kenya in 1898.
Visit Bushman, one of the most famous primates ever, a lowland gorilla who once lived right here in Chicago at our very own Lincoln Park Zoo.
Walk through Ancient Egypt, explore the Ancient Americas or see the beauty in the Grainger Hall of Gems. The Field Museum in Chicago has it all.

© The Field Museum, CSGN40496


History of the Museum from https://www.fieldmuseum.org/about/history/architecture

In 1905, The Field Museum was in dire need of a permanent home. Its original building, the Palace of Fine Arts from the World’s Columbian Exposition, was rapidly deteriorating. Contained within “The 1909 Burnham Plan for Chicago,” the plans for the new building were controversial both because of the proposed location and the style of the architecture. Burnham initially planned to place the museum on Congress Street in the center of Grant Park. Opposition arose to having any buildings in the park, and a legal battle that went all the way to the Illinois Supreme Court moved the museum’s proposed location. They initially decided to rebuild the museum in Jackson Park, and the steel and marble were delivered to the site in anticipation of construction. The plan was changed again when the South Park Commission reacquired land just south of Grant Park, and the museum was ultimately built at its present location just south of Roosevelt Road. Construction on the new building began on July 26, 1915. In 1918, the plans for the Museum were altered to allow the Museum to act as a hospital during World War I. Though the Board of Trustees reluctantly gave in to the agreement, the government cancelled the contract before any recovering soldiers were ever seen at the Field. More information on the Museum’s brief relationship with the military can be found at the Biodiversity Heritage Library.

Construction took almost six years to complete and cost approximately $7,000,000. The foundation alone took one year, and extends down 95 feet in some places. When it was first constructed, the building was made of 350,000 cubic feet of white Georgia marble and covered 20 acres of floor space. On May 2, 1921, the Field Museum was reopened to the public. Since that time, many additions have been made to the Museum’s floor plan, most notably the 2005 construction of the Collection’s Resource Center which added 186,000 square feet on two under-ground levels. The Museum’s exhibition space occupies over 480,000 square feet on the Ground, Main and Upper levels.  Stanley Field Hall itself accounts for a half an acre of floor space, with a length of 300 feet and a width of 70 feet. The Hall’s floor is comprised of 300 million year old fossilized limestone.

Neoclassical Inspiration: The Erechtheum and other Grecian and Roman Temples

See more images of the Grecian elements of the Field Museum’s architecture.

Botany, Low Relief Panel by Henry Hering, Winged female figure holding plants, fruits and flowers.

Geology, Low Relief Panel by Henry Hering, Winged female figure holding a globe with North and South American continents and a torch representing fire. 

Zoology, Low Relief Panel by Henry Hering, Winged female figure holding a horned animal skull. 

The Muses

Located at each corner of Stanley Field Hall, the four muses depict the purposes for which The Field Museum was founded.

 

 

 “Mr. Marshall Field announced that he would contribute the sum of $1,000,000 for the initial establishment of the museum.Other contributors promptly appeared. George M. Pullman and Harlow N. Higinbotham each subscribed $100,000. Other contributors of funds included Mrs. Mary D. Sturges, the McCormick Estate, P. D. Armour, Martin A. Ryerson, R. T. Crane, A. A. Sprague and many other leading citizens. Their contributions, together with donations of exposition stock, totaled nearly one-half million dollars by the end of the following year.

These funds enabled purchases to be made of large collections or important exhibits that had been shown at the exposition. Such purchases included those the War natural history collection, the Tiffany collection of gems, the collection of pre-Columbian gold ornaments, the Hassler ethnological collection from Paraguay, collections representing Javanese, Samoan and Peruvian ethnology, and the Hagenbeck collection of about 600 ethnological objects from Africa, the South Sea Islands, British Columbia, et cetera.” (official website)

SUE the T.rex fossil skeleton

History



 

Participating Vineyards & Chateaux
Beaulieu Vineyard (BV) Castello Banfi Caymus Vineyards Damilano Hess Collection J. Lohr Louis M. Martini Marqués de Riscal Merryvale Vineyards PerryMoore Rocca delle Macìe Roederer Estate St. Supéry Wente Yalumba
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Participating Restaurants
III Forks, 676 Restaurant & Bar, Acadia, AI Japanese Restaurant & Lounge, Argent Restaurant & Raw Bar, Atwood Café, Bistronomic, Black Dog Gelato  Café des Architectes, Chicago Coffee & Teas, Chicago Prime Meats, Coco Pazzo, Davanti Enoteca, deca Restaurant Fogo de Chao Francesca’s Restaurants
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6 responses to “EVOLVE is the Annual Fundraiser at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago

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