Flamboyant Flamenco: UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Spain

Flamenco in Madrid Spain

Flemenco is a Spanish fusion of music, singing and dance. Ethnic gypsies from Andalusia in southern Spain had a significant impact on the singing (cante), dancing (baile) and guitar playing (toque) that are used in flamenco. Consider it the “Dancing with the Stars” of Spain.

In this genre, voices can be filled with anguish and pain in cante jondo or express happiness and joy through movements in sevillanas and rumbas. Castanets, hand-clapping and foot-stomping create a lively and energetic performance.

Flamenco culture is native to Andalusia.

Flamenco culture is native to Andalusia. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is performed during religious festivals, rituals, ceremonies and celebrations. In November of 2010, UNESCO declared Flamenco one of the masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity which include “traditions, performing arts and practices that are inherited from ancestors and passed on to descendants.”

History and tradition co-exist in the rhythum of tablaos (flamenco stages) and clubs in Madrid where flamenco is very popular. The city offers a wide range of shows and serves as the hub of the record industry that presents this genre to the world.

Corral de la Moreria is one of the oldest Flamenco tablaos in Madrid and has been around since 1956 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfjryeug7FU&feature=related. Another popular venue is Cafe de Chinitas, located in the basement of an 18th century palace. Enjoy the granduer of a Vino con Vista dinner watching flamenco while visiting various regions of Spain.

“The Proclamation of Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity was made by the Director-General of UNESCO starting in 2001 to raise awareness on intangible cultural heritage and encourage local communities to protect them and the local people who sustain these forms of cultural expressions.

Several manifestations of intangible heritage around the world were awarded the title of Masterpieces to recognize the value of the non-material component of culture, as well as entail the commitment of states to promote and safeguard the Masterpieces.

Until 2005, a total of 90 Masterpieces from 70 countries had been proclaimed. 76 more elements were added on 30 September 2009, during the fourth session of the Committee.”

The "Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangi...

The “Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity” is a list maintained by UNESCO with pieces of intangible culture considered relevant by that organization. The map shows the distribution of Masterpieces by State Parties. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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6 Comments

Filed under Barcelona Spain, Catalon art and architecture in Barcelona, Easter in Madrid Spain, ebooks, Flamenco Dancing in Spain, Things to do in Madrid Spain, Toledo Spain is a UNESCO site, Travel and Tourism, UNESCO, UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage in SPain, UNESCO sites in Barcelona Spain, vino con vista

6 responses to “Flamboyant Flamenco: UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Spain

  1. joe

    Nice pictures and thanks for sharing useful information. Flamenco is alway a bustle and attractive dancing.

  2. Did you know that they have a big Flamenco program at the University of New Mexico? Check out my latest post.

  3. Pingback: Palladian Villas of the Venato became a UNESCO site in 1994 | Vino Con Vista Italy Travel Guides and Events

  4. Pingback: Vino con Vista in Ferrara: A UNESCO Site in Emilia Romagna | Vino Con Vista Italy Travel Guides and Events

  5. Flamenco culture is not homogeneously spread in Spain, neither in Andalucía population. There are some very special cities for Flamenco as Jerez, Cadiz province, Sevilla, Cordoba and Granada. Malaga, Almería and Cartagena are also cities with important tradition. Madrid and Barcelona has also flamenco important communities, because of the emigration from Andalusia, Extremadura and Murcia to the two most important cities in Spain during the XX Century.

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