Tag Archives: Bordeaux

The Wine Districts of Vino con Vista Bordeaux France

 

Bildbeschreibung: Karte Weinbaugebiet Bordeaux...

Bildbeschreibung: Karte Weinbaugebiet Bordeaux * Quelle: selbst erstellt * Zeichner: Domenico-de-ga * Datum: 24. Mai 2006 Cropping of Bordeaux wine map to just focus on the dessert wine districts. Reference original map for the numbers. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Bordeaux is the world’s premier wine capital! Here is detailed look at the region’s key districts, including the Médoc and its appellations, Pessac-Léognan, the Right Bank areas of Pomerol and St.-Emilion, and the sweet wine areas of Sauternes and Barsac: http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Bordeauxmap.pdf The Bordeaux region of France produces some of the world’s most famous wines including: St. Emilion, Margaux and Pauillac. The wine regions of Vino con Vista

Cabernet Sauvignon grapes growing in the Frenc...

Cabernet Sauvignon grapes growing in the French wine region of Bordeaux (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bordeaux encompass a large number of wine growing areas of the Gironde department of Aquitaine.

Map of the Gironde

Map of the Gironde (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bildbeschreibung: Karte Weinbaugebiet Bordeaux...

Bildbeschreibung: Karte Weinbaugebiet Bordeaux Quelle: selbst erstellt Zeichner: Domenico-de-ga Datum: 24. Mai 2006 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Bordeaux region is naturally divided by the Gironde Estuary into the Left Bank and the Right Bank. The Left Bank area includes the Médoc and Graves. The Right Bank area includes the Libournais, Bourg and Blaye.

Wine-growing areas of the left bank of Bordeau...

Wine-growing areas of the left bank of Bordeaux; Médoc, Graves and Sauternes (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“The Médoc is divided into Haut-Médoc (the upstream or southern portion) and Bas-Médoc (the downstream or northern portion, often referred to simply as “Médoc”).” There are various sub-regions within the Haut-Médoc, including St-Estèphe, Pauillac, St.-Julien and Margaux. Graves includes the sub-regions of Pessac-Léognan and Sauternes. Sauternes includes the sub-region of Barsac. The Libournais includes the sub-regions of Saint-Émilion and Pomerol. There is an additional wine region of Entre-Deux-Mers, so called because it lies between the Garonne and Dordogne rivers, which combine to form the Gironde. All of these regions (except the Libournais) have their own appellation. They are “governed by Appellation d’origine contrôlée laws which dictate the permissible grape varieties, alcohol level, methods of pruning and picking, density of planting and appropriate yields as well as various winemaking techniques.” Bordeaux wine labels will usually include the region on the front of the label.

English: A 2004 Château de Rochemorin Blanc, a...

English: A 2004 Château de Rochemorin Blanc, a wine from Pessac-Léognan in the Graves subregion of Bordeaux. It is one of André Lurton’s wine estates. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The permissible grape varieties in red Bordeaux are: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot. A general rule of thumb is that the Left Bank is predominately Cabernet Sauvignon based with the Right Bank being more Merlot based. The Graves area produces both red wine and white wine from the Sauvignon blanc, Sémillon and Muscadelle grapes. “Saint-Émilion is an Appellation d’origine contrôlée (AOC) for wine in the Bordeaux wine region of France. It is situated in the Libourne subregion on the right bank of the Dordogne.” Dr. EveAnn Lovero wrties Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

 

Deutsch: Weinberg in der Côte de Nuits, Burgun...

Deutsch: Weinberg in der Côte de Nuits, Burgund, Frankreich English: Vineyard in Côte de Nuits, Burgundy, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

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Vino con Vista Wine Bars and Tasting Events in Bordeaux France for Globe-Trotting Winos

Miroir Place de la Bourse

Miroir Place de la Bourse (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: The three graces fountain at the Plac...

English: The three graces fountain at the Place De La Bourse, Bordeaux (France) Deutsch: Der Trois-Grâces-Brunnen am Place De La Bourse in Bordeaux, Frankreich Français : Bordeaux (France) place de la Bourse, la fontaine des trois grâces (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Français : Bordeaux, Gironde, FRANCE

Français : Bordeaux, Gironde, FRANCE (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Map of the wine regions in France. Fr...

English: Map of the wine regions in France. Français : Carte des régions vinicoles de France. {| cellspacing=”0″ style=”min-width:40em; color:#000; background:#ddd; border:1px solid #bbb; margin:.1em;” class=”layouttemplate” | style=”width:1.2em;height:1.2em;padding:.2em” | 20px |link=|center | style=”font-size:.85em; padding:.2em; vertical-align:middle” |This vector image was created with Inkscape. |} Viticulture France.svg (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Images, from top, left to right: Place de la B...

Images, from top, left to right: Place de la Bourse Bordeaux quais 04.jpg by Olivier Aumage. Le tramway Tramway Bordeaux.jpg by Véronique Debord. Tourny/Maison de Vin Bordeaux centre.jpg by Barbarellaa Bordeaux crest Bordeaux Couronne.jpg by Olivier Aumage, CC-BY-SA-2.0-fr Quartier Mériadeck Bordeaux Mériadeck.jpg by timtom.ch Pont de pierre Bordeaux Pont de Pierre.jpg by Olivier Omage. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Grand Théâtre de Bordeaux

The Grand Théâtre de Bordeaux (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Le pont Bacalan Bastide à Bordeaux

Le pont Bacalan Bastide à Bordeaux (Photo credit: Matthieu Luna)

Français : Bordeaux, Gironde, FRANCE

Français : Bordeaux, Gironde, FRANCE (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Bordeaux, place de la bourse with tra...

English: Bordeaux, place de la bourse with tram. In front: miroir d´eau Deutsch: Bordeaux, place de la bourse mit Tram. Im Vordergrund: der Miroir d´eau Français : Bordeaux, place de la bourse avec tram, vue avec le miroir d´eau au premier plan (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bridge of Pierre over Garonne river in Bordeau...

Bridge of Pierre over Garonne river in Bordeaux, France. Deutsch: Der Pont de Pierre, zentrale Flussquerung aus napoleonischer Zeit Français : Le pont de Pierre sur la Garonne à Bordeaux, France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Façade de l'église Sainte-Croix de ...

Français : Façade de l’église Sainte-Croix de Bordeaux, au soleil couchant. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Château Margaux, a First Growth from the Borde...

Château Margaux, a First Growth from the Bordeaux region of France, is highly collectible. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

France is cloaked with spectacular Vino con Vista sipping and sojourning opportunities from Champagne to Bordeaux. Here’s a Wine Spectator map of all the wine regions in France:

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Francemap.pdf

The undisputed pinnacle of the French premium wine scene is Bordeaux with 60 appellations and about 10,000 wine estates/chateaux. The blending of Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Cabernet Franc grapes produces elegant wine. The area produces 5 premier cru (first growth) red wines:

The first growths are:

To learn more about Crus Classes visit http://www.crus-classes.com/

The Bordeaux Tourism Office provides the following information about visiting vineyards in distinct districts of Bordeaux:

• “The Médoc has outstanding vineyard soil, and includes prestigious great growths as well as numerous crus bourgeois. Estates often have impressive châteaux, whose architecture is, on occasion, remarkably unusual.

• The Blaye and Bourg regions have beautiful vine-covered slopes overlooking the Gironde estuary and villages with houses of golden-colored stone, Romanesque churches, famous archaeological sites, and typical small ports.

• Located on the right bank of the Dordogne, the medieval town of Saint-Emilion is not only famous for its fine wines, but also for its many historic monuments, and was listed in 1999 as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

• The Entre Deux Mers, the largest winegrowing region in Bordeaux, owes its name to the two rivers that mark its borders, the Garonne and the Dordogne. The Entre Deux Mers also features numerous historic landmarks including medieval bastides (fortified villages) and abbeys.

• The Graves region stretches from Bordeaux to Langon, along the west bank of the Garonne, as far south as the immense Landes pin forest.

In the city of Bordeaux, the Chartrons district features majestic residences, cellars, and warehouses that bear witness to a time when this part of town was the historic heart of the wine trade.”

Wine label from the French Bordeaux producer

Wine label from the French Bordeaux producer (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Here is a list of interesting wine bars for you to visit in Bordeaux:

BAR A VIN / Maison du Vin de Bordeaux
> Area : Quinconces (centre ville)
> Address : 1 cours du XXX juillet

33 (0)5 56 00 43 47

DIX (LE)
> Area : Saint Pierre (centre ville)
> Address : 10 place de la Bourse

33 (0)5 56 30 00 80
33 (0)5 56 44 63 99
MAX BORDEAUX | WINE GALLERY & CELLAR
> Area : Grands Hommes (centre ville)
> Address : 14 cours de l’Intendance

33 (0)5 57 29 23 81

 

MAX BORDEAUX | WINE GALLERY & CELLAR
> Area : Grands Hommes (centre ville)
> Address : 14 cours de l’Intendance

33 (0)5 57 29 23 81
VICTOR BAR / Grand Hôtel de Bordeaux*****
> Area : Grands Hommes (centre ville)
> Address : 2-5, Place de la Comédie

33 (0)5 57 30 44 44
33 (0)5 57 30 44 45
VINSET
> Area : Saint Pierre (centre ville)
> Address : 27 rue des Bahutiers

33 (0)9 52 19 09 37
¤ ATELIER DE CANDALE (L’)
> Area : ¤ St-Emilion | Pomerol | Fronsac
> Address : Château de Candale 1 Grandes Plantes

33 (0)5 57 24 15 45
33 (0)5 57 50 39 57
¤ TABLE D’HOTES AU CHATEAU SOUTARD
> Area : ¤ St-Emilion | Pomerol | Fronsac

33 (0)5 57 24 71 41
33 (0)5 57 74 42 80

Take a Bordeaux City Tour on the “Touristic Train”
with Audio Headphones:

WHEN: April, every day at 10:30 am – 11:45 am – 2 pm – 3.15 pm – 4.30 pm

Buy Tickets at the Bordeaux Tourist Office
12 cours du XXX-Juillet
Open from Monday to Saturday from 9 am to 6 pm & on Sunday from 11 am to 4:30 pm
Tel : +33 (0)5 56 00 68 15
no booking online

Departure and return, Allées de Tourny, near the Tourist Office,

Tour Opérator : Le petit train de Bordeaux

Bildbeschreibung: Karte Weinbaugebiet Bordeaux...

Bildbeschreibung: Karte Weinbaugebiet Bordeaux Quelle: selbst erstellt Zeichner: Domenico-de-ga Datum: 24. Mai 2006 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Attend the Bordeaux Wine Festival from June 26-29, 2014. The Bordeaux Wine Festival includes a wine trail along the Bordeaux quays, guided tours in the vineyards and wine tastings in mythical châteaux; art exhibitions, concerts, firework displays and a sound & light show every night!
All the details there: http://www.bordeaux-wine-festival.com/

Follow this link for more information: http://www.bordeaux-fete-le-vin.com/

You can make plans to visit wine chateaux from the Tourist office in Bordeaux:

Daily guided coach tour (French and English) at two wine châteaux* with tastings in the main Bordeaux vineyards
*at Saint-Emilion visit of one wine estate and of the medieval village

Every day from 1st of April to 15th of November
Monday: Blaye & Bourg
Tuesday: Entre-deux-Mers
Wednesday: Saint-Emilion*
Thursday:
Médoc
Friday:
Graves & Sauternes
Saturday:
Medoc
Sunday: Saint-Emilion*

On Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays: from 2. January to 31. March and from 16. November to 31. December except 25. December
Wednesday: Graves & Sauternes
Saturday: Medoc
Sunday: Saint-Emilion

Departure from the Bordeaux Tourist Office at 1.30 pm, return at 6.30 pm
Groups limited to 53 people.

For more information visit:

http://www.bordeaux-tourisme.com/pl/visites.pl?lg=uk&id=16

Français : Bordeaux, Gironde, FRANCE

Français : Bordeaux, Gironde, FRANCE (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here are some helpful links:

Find your search on the map Find the Bordeaux Tourist Office
See map of Bordeaux
See map of wine regions
Chateau Lafite Rothschild Label for the 1999 v...

Chateau Lafite Rothschild Label for the 1999 vintage (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ http://www.vino-con-vista.com

 

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Wine Adventures and Top Attractions in Vino con Vista Bordeaux France: A UNESCO Site called “Little Rome”

The marriage of Eleanor of Aquitaine to Henry ...

The marriage of Eleanor of Aquitaine to Henry II of England would have a dramatic influence on the development of the prominent French wine region of Bordeaux. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A photograph of Eleanor of Aquitaine'...

English: A photograph of Eleanor of Aquitaine’s wedding gift to her first husband, Louis VII of France. It is a rock crystal vase with an inscription on the bottom that reads, “As a bride, Eleanor gave the vase to King Louis – Mitadolus to her grandfather, the King to me, and Suger to the Saints.” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Les gisants d'Aliénor d'Aquitaine et Henri II ...

Les gisants d’Aliénor d’Aquitaine et Henri II à Fontevraud (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Wedding - Louis VII and Eleanor of Aq...

English: Wedding – Louis VII and Eleanor of Aquitaine (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Eleanor of Aquitaine, queen consort o...

English: Eleanor of Aquitaine, queen consort of Henry II of England. Français : Aliénor (ou Eleanor) d’Aquitaine, reine consort de Henry II Plantagenêt, roi d’Angleterre. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As soon as I unpacked my bag, I ventured out into the streets of Bordeaux. I was staying near the Cathedral so I headed over to explore the sacred contents. There was an outdoor market in the square in front of the church on the day that I visited.

The magnificent St. Andre Cathedral is a 17th-century church that took 400 years to build. It has hosted many dignitaries including Francois I, and Emperor Charles V. Louis XIII and Anne of Austria were married here. In 1137, the 13-year-old Eleanor of Aquitaine married the future Louis VII, a few months before she became Queen.

I loved the stained glass windows and the paintings by Jose Ribera, a Spanish artist. There are also some interesting Italian primitives from the 14th and 15th centuries. I love the 16th century alabaster statue of Our Lady of the Nave.

The Bordeaux Cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop. It was consecrated in 1096 by Pope Urban II.

 

Bordeaux Cathedral

Bordeaux Cathedral

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Cailhau portalea - atzealdea

Cailhau portalea – atzealdea (Photo credit: kixmi71)

Gargoyles of Saint-André Cathedral in Bordeaux...

Gargoyles of Saint-André Cathedral in Bordeaux, France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vineyards in Saint-Émilion.

Vineyards in Saint-Émilion. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: The Place de la Bourse, in Bordeaux, ...

English: The Place de la Bourse, in Bordeaux, France, as seen from the Garonne. Français : La Place de la Bourse à Bordeaux, vue de la Garonne. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tombeau de Jean Lefebvre de Cheverus (Mayenne ...

Tombeau de Jean Lefebvre de Cheverus (Mayenne 1768-Bordeaux 1836), cardinal-archevêque de Bordeaux, cathédrale Saint-André, Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, France. (Photo credit: byb64)

Galerie des évêques et des rois, portail royal...

Galerie des évêques et des rois, portail royal, cathédrale Saint-André, place Pey-Berland, Bordeaux, Gironde; Aquitaine, France. (Photo credit: byb64)

The French wine region of Saint Émilion on the...

The French wine region of Saint Émilion on the right bank in Bordeaux (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Basilique Saint-Michel (XIVe-XVIe), Bordeaux, ...

Basilique Saint-Michel (XIVe-XVIe), Bordeaux, Guyenne, Gironde, Aquitaine, France. (Photo credit: byb64)

Bordeaux has over 2500 years of history. Urban development in the city of Burdigala witnessed the Golden Age of Pax Romana. Visit the Roman Gallien Palace, formerly a 15000 seat amphitheater built in the 2nd century to witness the remains of Burdigala; “Little Rome.”

Palais Gallien in Bordeaux

Palais Gallien in Bordeaux

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Ruines du Palais Gallien, Bordeaux, Gironde, A...

Ruines du Palais Gallien, Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, France. (Photo credit: byb64)

Aquitane‘s regional capital enjoyed a strategic location along the banks of the Garonne River between southwestern France and Catalonia in Spain. In Bordeaux, the river meets the Gironde estuary that flows into the Atlantic Ocean at the Bay of Biscay. Bordeaux’s maritime prosperity from commerce and trade is readily apparent in the town’s magnificent architectural heritage.

Historically, the wine industry has been a tremendous source of wealth for Bordeaux. The city is surrounded by vineyards.

Every other year, Bordeaux celebrates their wine heritage with a wine tourism fair called Bordeaux Fete le Vin There are four days of festivities on the quays (River Banks). The local wine school offers an introduction to wine tasting class and there are plenty of wine tours to the magnificent chateaux. There are concerts, fireworks and special deals in the restaurants.

For more information visit:

www.bordeaux-fete-le-vin.com

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When I was in Bordeaux, I had an opportunity to attend L’Union des grands crus de Bordeaux Wine Weekend in Bordeaux.

There was a grand tasting session on Saturday with many of the estate owners from over 120 estates pouring their wine overlooking the river.

 

For details and dates for next year, visit www.ugcb.net

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Bordeaux exports wine around the world to wine enthusiasts. end wines, check out Max Bordeaux, a wine store by the Grand Theater.

 

At Max Bordeaux, load your card with some euros and start tasting. See you if you the Grand Crus from Latour and Lafite better that the other brands. The store has up to 50 of the best wines that are dispensed through the Enomatic vending machines.

Some of the most famous Bordeaux wines are from the Medoc sub-region including:

1.Château Lafite-Rothschild

2. Château Latour

3. Château Mouton-Rothschild

4. Château Margaux

Haut-Brion is not in Medoc

5. Château Haut-Brion

Château Cheval Blanc and Château Ausone in Saint-Émilion; and Château Pétrus and Château Le Pin in Pomerol are also very famous. Some of the world’s most famous sweet wines originate in the Sauternes appellation, such as Château d’Yquem.

After the merger of the dynasties of the Duchy of Aquitane and the Crown of England, wealth continued to soar. In 1137, Eleanor, the young Duchess of Aquitane married the future King Louis VII of France. Fifteen years later, they divorced and she married Henry II of England. This turned Aquitane into an English territory with plenty of business opportunities between the two countries. The English were wine enthusiasts and the Chartron neighborhood of Bordeaux is packed with former wine warehouses that have been refurbished and converted into hip venues on Quai de Chartrons.

 

Le Grand-Théâtre, Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine...

Le Grand-Théâtre, Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, France. (Photo credit: byb64)

Bordeaux 01

Bordeaux 01 (Photo credit: Pathien)

Esplanade des quinconces à Bordeaux

Esplanade des quinconces à Bordeaux (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Château Cheval-Blanc - Bordeaux - St. Emilion

Château Cheval-Blanc – Bordeaux – St. Emilion (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bordeaux Style Diapo'

Bordeaux Style Diapo’ (Photo credit: Alizée VAUQUELIN)

Château Mouton Rothschild - Bordeaux - Paulliac

Château Mouton Rothschild – Bordeaux – Paulliac (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

French wine from the Bordeaux producer

French wine from the Bordeaux producer (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chateau Pichon Baron, Pauillac, Bordeaux, France

Chateau Pichon Baron, Pauillac, Bordeaux, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Monolithic church of Saint-Émilion and its bel...

Monolithic church of Saint-Émilion and its bell tower (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vineyards in the French wine region of Bordeaux

Vineyards in the French wine region of Bordeaux (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Label of the French wine Cheval blanc from the...

Label of the French wine Cheval blanc from the Bordeaux wine region of St Emilion. Made predominately of Cabernet franc (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Deutsch: Logo UNESCO-Welterbe (Deutsche Version)

Deutsch: Logo UNESCO-Welterbe (Deutsche Version) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: "Chateau Cormeil-Figeac": a...

English: “Chateau Cormeil-Figeac”: a french Saint-Emilion bordeaux wine. Français : Chateau Cormeil-Figeac: un Saint-Emilion de 2004 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bildbeschreibung: Karte Weinbaugebiet Bordeaux...

Bildbeschreibung: Karte Weinbaugebiet Bordeaux Quelle: selbst erstellt Zeichner: Domenico-de-ga Datum: 24. Mai 2006 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Château Monbousquet, Saint-Émilion. French win...

Château Monbousquet, Saint-Émilion. French wine made in Saint Emilion on the right bank of Bordeaux (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bridge of Pierre over Garonne river in Bordeau...

Bridge of Pierre over Garonne river in Bordeaux, France. Deutsch: Der Pont de Pierre, zentrale Flussquerung aus napoleonischer Zeit Français : Le pont de Pierre sur la Garonne à Bordeaux, France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

~~ Bordeaux ~~

~~ Bordeaux ~~ (Photo credit: Jerry ツ)

French wine from the Saint Emilion region on t...

French wine from the Saint Emilion region on the right bank of Bordeaux (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Edouard Manet: Harbour at Bordeaux, 1871

Edouard Manet: Harbour at Bordeaux, 1871 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Wine label from the French Bordeaux producer

Wine label from the French Bordeaux producer (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bordeaux is the world’s premier wine capital! The Bordeaux region of France produces some of the world’s most famous expensive wines including: Margaux and Pauillac on the left bank of the Garonne River and St. Emilion on the right bank.

 

The wine regions of Bordeaux encompass a large number of wine growing areas of the Gironde department of Aquitaine.

 

The Bordeaux region is naturally divided by the Gironde Estuary into the Left Bank and the Right Bank. The Left Bank area includes the Médoc and Graves. The Right Bank area includes Libournais with St. Emilion, and Pomerol, Bourg and Blaye.

 

“The Médoc is  divided into Haut-Médoc (the upstream or southern portion) and Bas-Médoc (the downstream or northern portion, often referred to simply as “Médoc”).”

 

There are various sub-regions within the Haut-Médoc, including St-Estèphe, Pauillac, St.-Julien and Margaux. Graves includes the sub-regions of Pessac-Léognan and Sauternes. Sauternes includes the sub-region of Barsac.

 

My Wine Weekend in Bordeaux at the Union des Grands Crus de Bordeaux

My Wine Weekend in Bordeaux at the Union des Grands Crus de Bordeaux

 

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In addition to the Libournais  sub-regions of Saint-Émilion and Pomerol, there is also the wine region of Entre-Deux-Mers. This region is lies between the Garonne and Dordogne rivers, which combine to form the Gironde.

Bordeaux Wine

Bordeaux Wine

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All of these regions (except the Libournais) have their own appellation. They are “governed by Appellation d’origine contrôlée laws which dictate the permissible grape varieties, alcohol level, methods of pruning and picking, density of planting and appropriate yields as well as various winemaking techniques.”

 

Bordeaux wine labels will usually include the region on the front of the label. The permissible grape varieties in red Bordeaux blends are: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot. A general rule of thumb is that the Left Bank is predominately Cabernet Sauvignon based with the Right Bank including St. Emilion, being more Merlot based.

 

Château Cheval Blanc (“White Horse Castle”) is in St. Emilion. It is one of only four Chateaux to receive the highest rank of Premier Grand Cru Classé (A) status. The others are: Château Angélus, Château Ausone, and Château Pavie. Cheval Blanc’s second wine is Le Petit Cheval.

 

The Graves area produces both red wine and white wine from the Sauvignon blanc, Sémillon and Muscadelle grapes.

 

Here’s a Bordeaux picture gallery from UNESCO; http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1256/gallery/

Bordeaux France

Bordeaux France

Bordeaux France

Bordeaux France

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Bordeaux Map

Bordeaux Map

BordeauxBordeaux (Photo credit: Chambres Noires)

Most of the downtown area of Bordeaux is easy to explore by foot because it is pedestrian only. Rue Sainte-Catherine is the busiest street in town; over and half a mile long. It is loaded with shops and restaurants.

Rue St. Catherine in Bordeaux France

Rue St. Catherine in Bordeaux France

Here are some of the interesting sites in Le Vieux Bordeaux to visit:

Top Attractions in Bordeaux France

Top Attractions in Bordeaux France

 

1. The magnificent Opera National de Bordeaux (the Grand Theater) is considered the cultural heart of the city. Opened on April 7, 1780, it has 12 Corinthian columns in front that support the entablature on the peristyle. It has 12 statues by Berruer and Van Den Drix on top that represent the nine muses and Juno, Venus and Minerva.

The Grand Theater in Bordeaux France

The Grand Theater in Bordeaux France

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Français : Grand Théâtre, vue de nuit, Bordeau...

Français : Grand Théâtre, vue de nuit, Bordeaux, Gironde, FRANCE (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Muses et déesses, Grand-Théâtre, Bordeaux, Gir...

Muses et déesses, Grand-Théâtre, Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, France. (Photo credit: byb64)

Grand Theatre

Grand Theatre (Photo credit: Damian Synnott)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Parlement Square (Place du Parlement) was built around 1754. It has plenty of outdoor cafes surrounding the central fountain.

Bordeaux France Sites and Statuary

Bordeaux France Sites and Statuary

France 2014 1283Like most of the limestone structures in Bordeaux, you can admire the interesting

Place du Parlement, Bordeaux (33)

Place du Parlement, Bordeaux (33) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

masks or mascaron that decorate the buildings.

Français : Bordeaux place du parlement, la fon...

Français : Bordeaux place du parlement, la fontaine de la place (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Bordeaux place du parlement

Français : Bordeaux place du parlement (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. St. Andre Cathedral, a 17th-century church took 400 years to build and has hosted many dignitaries including Francois I, and Emperor Charles V. Lousi XIII and Anne of Austria were married here. In 1137, the 13-year-old Eleanor of Aquitaine married the future Louis VII, a few months before she became Queen. You can even visit the market and pick some interesting leather items.

 

 

There are paintings by Jose Ribera, and Italian primitives from the 14th and 15th centuries. I love the 16th century alabaster statue of Our Lady of the Nave. The Pey-Berland bell tower is free-standing next to the Cathedral. It is named after the archbishop who commissioned it in 1440. It is crowned with a gilded copper statue of Our Lady of Aquitaine. Climb to the top of the tower for a breathtaking 360 degree panaorama of Bordeaux.

Notre Dame D'Aquitaine (HDR) - Tour Pey Berlan...

Notre Dame D’Aquitaine (HDR) – Tour Pey Berland – Bordeaux (Photo credit: Jonathan d[-_-]b)

Pey-Berland tower near Saint-André Cathedral i...

Pey-Berland tower near Saint-André Cathedral in Bordeaux, France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The north-façade of the cathedral

The north-façade of the cathedral (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

4. Place de la Bourse (Place Royale) was designed by the Gabriels, junior and senior, between 1730 and 1755. Originally, it provided a spectacular backdrop for a monumental statue of King Louis XV. The statue was melted down in 1792 and replaced in 1869 by the fountain of the Three Graces. This naked royal nymphs on top of the fountain represent Empress Eugenia, Queen Victoria and Queen Isabella of Spain.

The Three Graces in Bordeaux

The Three Graces in Bordeaux

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Everyone love the  Water Mirror (Mirror d’eau) in Bordeaux.

 

English: Golden statue on the Pey-Berland towe...

English: Golden statue on the Pey-Berland tower, near towers of Saint-André Cathedral in Bordeaux (southwest of France) Français : Tour Pey-Berland, couronnée d’une grande statue dorée, près des flèches des tours gothiques de la cathédrale St André à Bordeaux (France) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Bordeaux water mirror

Bordeaux water mirror (Photo credit: iSivand)

You can visit the Musee National Des Douanes in this square.

Make dinner reservations at Le Gabriel for an outstanding Michelin-starred gastronomic extravaganza.

Michelin-starred Le Gabriel in Bordeaux

Michelin-starred Le Gabriel in Bordeaux

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Bordeaux France

Bordeaux France

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Bordeaux also has some interesting sites with architectural significance including:

 

1. One of Europe’s largest squares, the Quinconces Square (Esplanade de Quinconces) is located on the banks of the Garone River. Take some photos with the massive statues of Montaigne and Montesquieu. The statues were sculpted by Maggesi in 1858.

 

I love the monument and fountain dedicated to the Girondins. The base has beautiful bronze horses and warriors. The column is crowned with Liberty.

Bordeaux Memorial

Bordeaux Memorial

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The Girondins’ Column is a magnificent 140 foot column that was erected in 1902. At the base, the sea-horses are spouting water.  During WWII, the Germans removed the horses with plans of dismantling the monumentand using the bronze for military purposes. In 1945, the horses were found and eventually remounted on the fountain.

 

Quincones Square Fountain in Bordeaux

Quincones Square Fountain in Bordeaux

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2. The elaborate Cailhau Gate was built in 1495 to commemorate the conquest of Naples and the victory at Fornova.

Calihou Gate in Bordeaux France

Calihou Gate in Bordeaux France

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Porte Cailhau, Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, F...

Porte Cailhau, Bordeaux, Gironde, Aquitaine, France. (Photo credit: byb64)

Cailhau portalea - aurrealdea

Cailhau portalea – aurrealdea (Photo credit: kixmi71)

 

3. The Great Bell (la Grosse Clock) was the Town Hall belfry as far back as the 15th century. The bell was cast in 1775. Above the lantern Tower is a leopard weathervane.

Bordeaux - Oh la Grosse Cloche !

Bordeaux – Oh la Grosse Cloche ! (Photo credit: Sam Nimitz)

 

Bordeaux Clock Tower

Bordeaux Clock Tower

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Bordeaux Clock Tower

Bordeaux Clock Tower

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Take time to visit St. Eloi Church, next to the clock tower.

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Another interesting church to visit is the Gothic Basilique Saint-Michel, built between the 14th and 16th centuries. Take a photo of the gorgeous  altarpiece depicting the triumph of Michael over the dragon. This is a stop on the Santiago de Compostello pilgrimage. Climb to the top of the bell tower from June through September for a fabulous Vino con Vista opportunity.

The way of Saint James in Bordeaux

The way of Saint James in Bordeaux

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Go to the Church of Saint Bruno, a former 17th century Carthusian monastery. On each side of the altar, you will see Bernini statues. The high altar as a beautiful “Assumption” painting by Phillippe de Champaigne from 1673.

The 17th century Jesuit Notre Dame Church is also worth visiting. It has a single barrel-vaulted nave.

The basilica church of St. Seurin, the patron saint of Bordeaux,  is the cradle if Christianity in Bordeaux. It was built next to a former 3rd century church used by Bordeaux’s first Christians. There is an archaeology museum in the church with relics and stone coffins that have been exhumed from the vast cemetery where pilgrims on their way to Santiago de Compostela come to pray.

 

Here are some of the other interesting churches to visit in Bordeaux:

 

Churches in Bordeaux

Churches in Bordeaux

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Churches in Bordeaux France

Churches in Bordeaux France

Grand théâtre de Bordeaux

Grand théâtre de Bordeaux (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Get tickets for the Neo-Classical Grand Theater. It has a resident ballet and opera company.

Go to the Aquitane Museum for Roman and Greek artifacts. You can learn about the complete history of Bordeaux here.

 

The Cimetiere de la Chartruese (cemetery) in the center of Bordeaux has lovely 19th century monuments to photograph. Goya’s memorial is here but his body is in Spain.

Cemetery in Bordeaux France

Cemetery in Bordeaux France

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According to UNESCO:
“The Port of the Moon, port city of Bordeaux in south-west France, is inscribed as an inhabited historic city, an outstanding urban and architectural ensemble, created in the age of the Enlightenment, whose values continued up to the first half of the 20th century, with more protected buildings than any other French city except Paris. It is also recognized for its historic role as a place of exchange of cultural values over more than 2,000 years, particularly since the 12th century due to commercial links with Britain and the Low Lands. Urban plans and architectural ensembles of the early 18th century onwards place the city as an outstanding example of innovative classical and neoclassical trends and give it an exceptional urban and architectural unity and coherence. Its urban form represents the success of philosophers who wanted to make towns into melting pots of humanism, universality and culture.”

Outstanding Universal Value

Bordeaux, Port of the Moon, is an outstanding example of the exchange of human values over more than two thousand years, due to its role as capital city of a world-famous wine production region and the importance of its port in commerce at regional and international levels. The urban form and architecture of the city are the result of continuous extensions and renovations since Roman times up to the 20th century. Urban plans and architectural ensembles stemming from the early 18th century onwards place the city as an outstanding example of classical and neo-classical trends and give it an exceptional urban and architectural unity and coherence.

 

Criterion (ii): Bordeaux, Port of the Moon, constitutes an exceptional testimony to the exchange of human values over more than two thousand years. These exchanges have provided this cosmopolitan town, in the age of Enlightenment, an unparalleled prosperity that provided for an exceptional urban and architectural transformation that continued through 19th century up to present time. The different stages of construction and development of the harbour town are legible in its urban plan, especially the big transformations carried out from the early 18th century onwards.

 

Criterion (iv): Bordeaux, Port of the Moon, represents an outstanding urban and architectural ensemble, created in the Age of Enlightenment, whose values have continued up to the first half of the 20th century. Bordeaux is exceptional in the unity of its urban and architectural classical and neo-classical expression, which has not undergone any stylistic rupture over more than two centuries. Its urban form represents the success of philosophers who wanted to make towns into melting pots of humanism, universality and culture.

 

Due to its port, the city of Bordeaux has retained its original functions since its creation, as a city of exchange and commerce. Its history is easily legible in its urban plans from the Roman castrum to the 20th century. The city has retained its authenticity in the historic buildings and spaces created in the 18th and 19th centuries.”

 

A tanker is unloading in the Pauillac haven, w...

A tanker is unloading in the Pauillac haven, which is a subsidiary of Bordeaux port, France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“The City of Bordeaux has 347 listed buildings, referred to the law of 31 December 1913. The historic town is protected by the “Plan de sauvegarde et de mise en valeur” (PSMV), approved in 1988 and revised in 1998 and 2002. A buffer zone has been established. Management structures for the protection and conservation of the nominated property include the shared responsibilities of national, regional and local governments. Interventions on buildings declared Monuments historiques (classés) must have the support of the Ministry for Culture. Several plans ensure the management and conservation of the property and take into account the following aspects: preserving the historic and heritage character, allowing the controlled evolution of the historic centre, unifying the various planning rules and contributing to the international significance of metropolitan Bordeaux.” UNESCO

 

Mae plans to explore the charming medieval village of St Emilion. Start the tour with a visit and wine-tasting session in a grand cru estate of St Emilion. The village of St Emilion is named after a Breton monk from the eighth century whose followers started wine production in the area, it is also a  UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Bordeaux wine village of St. Emilion

Bordeaux wine village of St. Emilion (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Walk along the original city walls and climb the steep cobblestone streets, exploring wine cellars, artisan studios and art galleries.

 

 

News rss

 

Here’s a video from UNESCO; http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/932/video

 

Vineyards in the French wine region of St Emil...

Vineyards in the French wine region of St Emilion in right bank of Bordeaux (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

 

Wine-growing areas of the left bank of Bordeau...

Wine-growing areas of the left bank of Bordeaux; Médoc, Graves and Sauternes (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Growing in the wine region of St-Estephe in th...

Growing in the wine region of St-Estephe in the Medoc, Bordeaux France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

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St. Emilion is a Vino con Vista Wine Destination And UNESCO World Heritage Site in France

Dordogne valley

Dordogne valley (Photo credit: dynamosquito)

Vineyards in Saint-Émilion.

Vineyards in Saint-Émilion. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Old Door - Saint-Emilion, France

Old Door – Saint-Emilion, France (Photo credit: Austin Beeman – (Formerly Beemantv))

English: The town of Saint-Emilion

English: The town of Saint-Emilion (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Eglise mololithe de Saint Emilion (Gironde, Fr...

Eglise mololithe de Saint Emilion (Gironde, France) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Discover the charming medieval village of Saint Emilion, a Vino con Vista UNESCO site in France.  I love the 13th century ramparts.
St. Emilion is named after an 8th century monk whose followers were instrumental in producing wine in this area.
According to UNESCO:
“Legend has it that in the mid 8th century a Breton monk, Emilian, sought asylum here from the Benedictine community and led an eremitic life in a cave. His numerous miracles attracted many companions, who lived according to the rule of St Benedict. It was they who began to build the great monolithic church, which was not to be completed for another three centuries. Since the region was on the Pilgrimage Route to Santiago de Compostela, from the 11th century onwards it experienced great prosperity and many monasteries, churches, and other religious buildings were founded. To construct the many large stone buildings that this entailed, the excellent limestone of the region was quarried extensively, an industry that continued until well into the 18th century.”
Stroll along the original city walls. Climb the steep cobblestone streets.
Explore art studios and galleries. Make an appointment to visit some of the Grand Cru Estates for a wine tasting located in the Libourne subregion on the right bank of the Dordogne River. The wines are typically blended from Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon.

Saint Émilion wines were not included in the original 1855 Bordeaux classification.

Château Ausone and Château Cheval Blanc are the only two wines currently classified as Premiers grands crus classes A (First Great Growths category A). There are then 13 Premiers grands crus classés B and 53 grands crus classés. In addition, a large number of vineyards are classified as Grand Cru.” Wikipedia
Here’s the UNESCO description:

Jurisdiction of Saint-Emilion

“Viticulture was introduced to this fertile region of Aquitaine by the Romans, and intensified in the Middle Ages. The Saint-Emilion area benefited from its location on the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela and many churches, monasteries and hospices were built there from the 11th century onwards. It was granted the special status of a ‘jurisdiction’ during the period of English rule in the 12th century. It is an exceptional landscape devoted entirely to wine-growing, with many fine historic monuments in its towns and villages.

Long Description

The Jurisdiction of Saint-Emilion is an outstanding example of a historic vineyard landscape that has survived intact and in activity to the present day.

The first traces of human settlement in the Saint-Emilion region date back at least to the Upper Palaeolithic (35,000-10,000 BC). The Pierrefitte menhir confirms human presence in the 5th-4th millennia BC. The region was heavily populated during the Celtic-Gaulish period, as testified by an oppidum (defended hill fort) on the plateau overlooking modern Saint-Emilion. The Roman occupation began when Augustus created the province of Aquitania in 27 BC with the first vineyards by grafting new varieties of grape on the Vitis biturica that grew naturally in the region.

The first Christian monasteries appear at the beginning of the 7th century. As the region was on the Pilgrimage Route to Santiago de Compostela, from the 11th century onwards it experienced great prosperity and many monasteries, churches and other religious buildings were founded.

When Eleanor of Aquitaine married Henry Plantagenet (later Henry II of England), the town of Saint-Emilion, by then fortified, became part of the English Kingdom, along with all Guyenne. The town was to change hands repeatedly in the course of the Hundred Years’ War; in 1453 it became French permanently. It was to suffer again during the Wars of Religion in the later 16th century; as a result the town retained its medieval appearance until the 18th century, when its fortifications were dismantled.

This had an adverse effect on the vineyards, and it was not until 1853 that Saint-Emilion started to recover, thanks to its vineyards. In the 18th century the quality of the wines from the region was recognized as exceptional. During the Second Empire production of red wines in the region became generalized, replacing the white wines that had been most common in the medieval period. Their distribution was greatly facilitated by the opening in 1853 of the railway line between Paris and Bordeaux. By comparison with other vineyard regions of the Bordelais, Saint-Emilion has been noteworthy for its innovations, such as the establishment of the first wine syndicate in 1884 and the first cooperative cellars in the Gironde in 1932.

The property covers 7,846 ha; the relief characterized by a stratum of limestone defined by shelves that criss-cross the landscape. This disappears to the north and is replaced by a heterogeneous mixture of clayey sands and gravels, dipping towards the south. Two slopes are clearly distinguishable: the northern one is gentle and cut by valleys, the southern steeply plunging into the Dordogne valley and forming concave valleys (combes ), in one of which the town of Saint-Emilion is situated. The landscape presents a monoculture, that of vineyards exclusively, and occupying more than 67.5% of the total area. Apart from the human settlements, the only other traces of exploitation are the abandoned underground quarries, which supplied limestone for the religious and public buildings of Bordeaux and its hinterland until the 18th century.

Before viticulture predominated, medieval and Renaissance castles were built on dominant sites as seigniorial residences. Examples are the 13th-century Château Laroque (Saint-Christophe-des-Bardes), the 14th-century Château de Preyssac (Saint-Étienne-de-Lisse), and the 16th-century Château Ferrand (Saint-Hippolyte). By contrast, the ‘vineyard’ castles are located at the centre of their respective domains. They range in date from the mid-18th century (Château Ausone, Château Canon) through the early 19th century (Château Cheval-Blanc, Château Mondot) to the late 19th and early 20th centuries (Château Laroze, Château La Gaffalière).

Settlements are characterized by modest stone houses, most dating from the first half of the 19th century. They never have more than two storeys, and are found in small groups, for the use of vineyard workers. The chais (wine storehouses) are large functional rectangular structures built from stone or a mixture of brick and stone, with tiled double-pitched roofs.” UNESCO

“The Roman occupation began when Augustus created the province of Aquitania in 27 BC. With the prosperity of Burdigala (Bordeaux), Valerius Probus used his legions to fell the Cumbris forest in AD 275 BC and created the first vineyards by grafting new varieties of grape on the Vitis biturica that grew naturally in the region. There are considerable traces of Roman occupation, especially rich villas, and it was here that the Latin poet Ausonius retired when he withdrew from public affairs in the 4th century.

When Eleanor of Aquitaine married Henry Plantagenet (later Henry II of England), the town of Saint-Emilion, by then fortified, became part of the English kingdom, along with all Guyenne. King John granted the town full liberties in 1199.

In 1224, when this part of Guyenne had been recovered for France, Louis VIII began work on the Royal Castle, not to be completed until 1237, by Henry III of England. In 1298 Edward I signed a decree defining the limits of the jurisdiction. Five years later it became once again part of France under Philippe Le Bel, though it was to change hands repeatedly in the course of the Hundred Years’ War.

In 1453 it became French permanently, and three years later Charles VII confirmed all the privileges granted by the English to the town to help it re-establish itself. It was to suffer again during the Wars of Religion in the later 16th century and, despite the efforts of Louis XIV, it lost its leading position to Libourne. As a result the town retained its medieval appearance until the 18th century, when its fortifications were dismantled. Profound social changes were introduced during the Revolution which destroyed the old order, dating from the Middle Ages, and many of the ancient buildings were demolished or fell into ruins.

These had an adverse effect on the vineyards, and it was not until 1853 that Saint-Emilion started to recover, thanks to its vineyards. During the 12th and 13th centuries these had produced what were known as vins honorifiques (known in English as “Royal wines”) because they were presented as gifts to kings and important people, which gives an indication of their quality. A regulatory body known as La Jurade monitored the quality of the wine of Saint-Emilion and granted this appellation to a limited number of wines.

The demands of Flemish consumers in the 18th century led to an increase in viticulture, since the quality of the Saint- Emilion wines enabled them to be transported by sea without the wine turning into vinegar. That century saw the quality of the wines from the region becoming recognized as exceptional, as witnessed by countless records of the period. During the Second Empire production of red wines in the region became generalized, replacing the white wines that had been most common in the medieval period. Their distribution was greatly facilitated by the opening in 1853 of the railway line between Paris and Bordeaux.” UNESCO

Learn more about Saint-Emilion here:

Jurisdiction of Saint-Emilion (UNESCO/NHK)

Château Monbousquet, Saint-Émilion. French win...

Château Monbousquet, Saint-Émilion. French wine made in Saint Emilion on the right bank of Bordeaux (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Here’s a video from UNESCO; http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/932/video

Book a room at the Chateau Grand Barrail, in a lavish wine estate overlooking the vineyards. http://www.grand-barrail.com/uk/

 

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Vineyards in the French wine region of St Emil...

Vineyards in the French wine region of St Emilion in right bank of Bordeaux (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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The Globe-Trotting Wino’s Guide to Trekking, Tasting and Touring Adventures in the World’s Great Wine Capitals

Napa Valley

Napa Valley (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Front of Chateau. French wine producer

Front of Chateau. French wine producer (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Glass of California, Napa Valley red wine. Opu...

Glass of California, Napa Valley red wine. Opus One is a Bordeaux style blend made predominately with Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

At the estate of the Bordeaux producer.

At the estate of the Bordeaux producer. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mustards in the spring in Napa Valley. Photo b...

Mustards in the spring in Napa Valley. Photo by Emily Bryden, 2005 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mainz_04

Mainz_04 (Photo credit: Alf Igel)

Location in the state of California

Location in the state of California (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vineyards in the California wine region of Son...

Vineyards in the California wine region of Sonoma county. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ferrari-Carano Reserve tasting room in Sonoma ...

Ferrari-Carano Reserve tasting room in Sonoma Valley, California (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Wine Centre of Australia, Adelaide

English: Wine Centre of Australia, Adelaide (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Relief und Topographie von Rheinhessen

Relief und Topographie von Rheinhessen (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Napa Valley, California

English: American Canyon, CA is called "T...

English: American Canyon, CA is called “The Gateway to the Napa Valley”. This sign is located at the intersection of Flosden Rd. and American Canyon Rd. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Napa

Napa (Photo credit: katieharbath)

There are nine internationally renowned wine regions in the world. The Great Wine Capitals Global Network is a network of  these nine major global cities that are located in the northern and southern hemispheres.

Enjoying malbec rosé in Mendoza, Argentina.

Enjoying malbec rosé in Mendoza, Argentina. (Photo credit:

English: Vineyard in Napa Valley
English: Vineyard in Napa Valley (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Wikipedia)

These nine regions include:

Bordeaux, where exceptional wines are the principal attraction, especially in the northern region of Medoc. This area includes growing areas like: Pauillac, Margaux, St Julien and St Estephe. Wines here are typically produced from Cabernet Sauvignon grapes.

The region’s ancient châteaux are the home of esteemed wineries. You can visit the “Route des Chateaux” (Castle Road)  and explore the medieval town of St-Emilion, a treasured UNESCO World Heritage site. The town has catacombs and an underground Monolithic church carved into the limestone. The region’s wines are made at the Chateau Haut-Sarpe (Grand Cru Classe), Chateau Figeac and Chateau Beau Séjour Becot.

The other great wine capitals include:

P1010081

P1010081 (Photo credit: jcmorand)

Bégédan vineyards in the Haut-Medoc of Bordeaux.

Bégédan vineyards in the Haut-Medoc of Bordeaux. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cape Town

Christchurch |

South Island

Florence/Tuscany

Mainz/ |Rheinhessen

Mendoza

Porto

Bilbao |

Rioja

San Francisco/ |Napa Valley

English: Fall in Napa Valley

English: Fall in Napa Valley (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Great Wine Capitals Global Network ci...

English: Great Wine Capitals Global Network city members Français : Localisation des villes-régions membres du Réseau des Capitales de Grands Vignobles (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This network holds a prestigious annual competition; called the “Best Of Wine Tourism” awards “to reward the wineries in each member city that have distinguished themselves in terms of the excellence of their facilities in various categories from art and culture to sustainable wine tourism.”

Visit the Great Wine Capitals Global Network: A World of Excellence!

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ http://www.vino-con-vista.com

Château de Malle - Bordeaux - Sauternes

Château de Malle – Bordeaux – Sauternes (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Wine Tourism Articles Compiled by Sonoma State University

As a college professor and former business school dean, I was interested in the Wine Business Degree Program at Sonoma State University. The program covers concepts related to competitiveness, globalization, strategy and social media.  Since these are concepts that I teach, I thought I should delve further and learn about the program.

I recently wrote a blog post  “Oregon Wineries Leveraging the Power of Social Media”: http://wp.me/pRq9Q-4nT because I was so intrigued by the entire process. I thought it was an outstanding Case Study in Social Media and Wine Tourism.

I found these interesting articles on the Sonoma State Wine Business Program website, so I wanted to share them with my students. If you follow my blogs, you know that I love to share information with my students using Social Media.

Sonoma State University

Sonoma State University (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vineyards in the California wine region of the...

Here are some interesting articles related to Wine Tourism:

Thach, L. (2011). “Dirt Attractions: Do Terroir and Wine Tourism Work Together?” Winebusiness.com Sept. 28, 2011. Read the article here.

Edouard Manet: Harbour at Bordeaux, 1871

Edouard Manet: Harbour at Bordeaux, 1871 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

U. Orth, A. Stöckl, T. Bouzdine-Chameeva,, J. Brouard, A. Cavicchi, M. Faraoni, M. Larreina, B. Lecat, J. Olsen, C. Rodriguez-Santos, C. Santini, R. Veale and D. Wilson.  (2011). The Role of Tourism Experiences in Attaching Consumers to Regional Brands. Proceedings of 6th Academy of Wine Business Research Conference, Bordeaux, France, June 9-10, 2011.

Bottles of Bordeaux Wine in Shop, Bordeaux, France

Bottles of Bordeaux Wine in Shop, Bordeaux, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Olsen, J. (2009). “At-destination Visitor Decision Making in a Wine Tourism Context,” Presentation at The International Academy of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research 6th Symposium, Vienna, Austria, June 1-3, 2009.

Thach, L. (Sept. 2009). Wine from China’s Silk Road: The Challenges of Implementing a Wine Tourism Strategy. Wine Business Monthly Online. Read the article here.

Vineyards in the Sonoma County wine region of ...

Vineyards in the Sonoma County wine region of Alexander Valley. View from California wine producer Hanna Winery. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Thach, L. (2007). Trends in Wine Tourism. Wine Business Monthly,Vol. 14, No. 8, p 86-89. Read the article here.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides and Apps @ www.vino-con-vista.com.

Sonoma State students are welcome to follow me @socialmediaevie where I tweet business-related content to my students from my Pinterest Boards. It appears to me that you picked a very interesting major!

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