Tag Archives: Spain

Give Your Sweetie a Rose on Saint Jordi’s Day in Barcelona Spain

Saint George and the Dragon at Casa Amatller

Image via Wikipedia

Once upon a time in the town of Montblanc in Catalunya, a terrible dragon terrorized the inhabitants. A lottery system was generated to appease the dragon. The system sacrificed one of the town residents to the dragon. Unfortunately, one day the princess won the lottery and had to be sacrificed. She was rescued from the dragon’s wrath by a handsome knight in shining armour named Jordi (George).

Saint George (Saint Jordi) is the patron saint of Catalonia. Saint Jordi’s Day in Barcelona Spain is a Catalon Holiday that celebrates the chivalrous efforts of dragon-slaying, damsel- in-distress rescuing Saint George. On April 23rd,  six million roses will change hands in Barcelona when men become knights for a day. They will give their sweetie a single rose to honor Saint George, the patron saint and protector of the inhabitants of Catalonia who rescued the princess from the terrible dragon. He gave her a red rose plucked from a rose bush that sprouted from the dragons blood after the dragon was killed by St. Jordi’s mighty sword.

Català: Josep Puig i Cadafalch

Català: Josep Puig i Cadafalch (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On April 23rd, lovers walk arm in arm on Las Ramblas toward the sea or in the direction of Placa Catalunya gazing at the lovely flower stalls and visiting La Boqueria Market.

Barcelona Spain

St. Jordi's Day in Barcelona

Barcelona Spain

Lovers also stroll along the Passeig de Gracia buying books from street vendors and book stores. In 1923, the tradition of giving your damsel a rose was expanded. Damsels give their knight in shining armour a book, since April 23rd also coincides with the anniversary of the death of William Shakespear and Cervantes in 1616.

In Barcelona, visit Gaudi’s Casa Batllo (House of Bones) on Passeig de Gracia, 43. It is on the UNESCO World Heritage List. The magnificent art noveau structure is located on the “Block of Discord” with incredible buildings designed by famous architects like Josep Puig i Cadafalch, Lluis Domenech i Montaner and Enric Sagnier. Casa Batllo has a facade based on the Tale of Saint Jordi (Saint George). The bones of the dragon’s victims frame the elaborate windows of the facade. The facade is covererd with trencadis glazed mosaic tile. The roof  has a large arch that represents the scales of the dragon http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j31eZTrW0Ss.

St. Jordi's Day in Barcelona Spain

St. Jordi's Day in Barcelona Spain

Gaudi's Barcelona Spain

Happy St. Jordi’s Day– “Felic Diada de Sant Jordi” from your Travel Buddies @ www.vino-con-vista.com.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides and Vino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites
 

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

5 Comments

Filed under Antoni Gaudi's Barcelona, Attractions in Barcelona Spain, Barcelona Spain

Gaudi’s Magnificent La Sagrada Familia is a Vino con Vista UNESCO Site in Barcelona Spain

Maqueta de la Sagrada Familia

Maqueta de la Sagrada Familia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Ventilation towers on the roof of Cas...

English: Ventilation towers on the roof of Casa Milà designed by Antoni Gaudi, Barcelona, Spain Français : Cheminées d’aération sur le toit de la Casa Milà réalisée par Antoni Gaudi, Barcelone, Espagne (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sagrada Família church, by Gaudí.

Image via Wikipedia

English: The Sagrada Familia viewed from Casa ...

English: The Sagrada Familia viewed from Casa Milà, Barcelona, Spain Français : La Sagrada Familia vue de la Casa Milà, Barcelone, Espagne (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Español: Gaudí y el nuncio Ragonesi visitan la...

Español: Gaudí y el nuncio Ragonesi visitan la Sagrada Familia (1915). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Sculpture of Philip the Apostle on a ...

English: Sculpture of Philip the Apostle on a tower of the Sagrada Familia, Barcelona, Spain Français : Sculpture de l’Apôtre Philippe sur une des tours de la Sagrada Familia, Barcelone, Espagne (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Español: Fachada del Nacimiento, Sagrada Famil...

Español: Fachada del Nacimiento, Sagrada Familia (Barcelona). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are seven properties built by the renowned architect Antoni Gaudí (1852–1926) in or near Barcelona that have been classified as UNESCO sites. Barcelona is blessed with the legacy of this incredible man in the same way that the city of Rome is blessed with Bernini‘s legacy.

His exceptional masterpieces yield harmonious colors and fluid lines that are a testiment to his creative genius. He contributed to the development of architecture and building technology in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Antoni Gaudí, Casa Batlló

Antoni Gaudí, Casa Batlló (Photo credit: profzucker)

The UNESCO monuments include: Casa Vicens; Gaudí’s work on the Nativity façade and Crypt of La Sagrada Familia; Casa Batlló; and the Crypt in Colonia Güell. His works demonstrate “el Modernisme of Catalonia.”

Antoni Gaudi was born in Reus in 1852, a small town south of Barcelona. He died in an accident in 1926.

Interior del Templo Expiatorio de la Sagrada F...

Interior del Templo Expiatorio de la Sagrada Familia en Barcelona (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

His major feat was his association with the church of Sagrada Familia that was started by the architect Francesc de P. del Villar in 1882 in Gothic revival style. In 1883, Gaudi made fundamental changes to the project and he continued working on the church based on a Latin cross, until his death. Visit the museum under the church that chronicles Gaudi’s contributions including his models and his original drawings.

Détail de la Sagrada Familia de Gaudi à Barcelone

Détail de la Sagrada Familia de Gaudi à Barcelone (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Gaudi’s vision has been realized http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irlQiGnUuMQ. The passionate commitment of the heroic efforts of people involved in building this magnificent church will make you weep.

Gaudi's Barcelona Spain

Gaudi's Barcelona Spain Sagrada Familia

Sagrada Familia in Barcelona Spain

Gaudi's Barcelona Spain

The church has three facades: The Nativity to the east, the Passion facade on the west and the Glory facade on the south which has not been completed. The Glory facade will explain the life and the end of man presided over by St. Joseph in his workshop. Watch a brief video to see the magnificent structure http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hskV6b9SwPA.

Español: Busto de Gaudí, Joan Matamala, Museo ...

Español: Busto de Gaudí, Joan Matamala, Museo de la Sagrada familia. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The influencial architect has the most influence on the Nativity facade. It was built between 1894 and 1930. It is dedicated to the birth of Jesus and is decorated with ornate sculptures and faces the rising sun to the northeast. It is divided into three porticos that represent faith, hope and charity. The Tree of Life rises above the door. The facade includes different episodes of the Childhood of Jesus including the Immaculate Conception.

Gaudi's Barcelona Spain

Gaudi's Barcelona Spain

Nativity Facade

Gaudi's Barcelona Spain

Sagrada Familia Church in Barcelona Spain

The Passion facade has gaunt, skeletal characters which were designed by Josep Maria Subirachs. His hard llines represent the pain and final scrifice of the life of Jesus. A crucified Christ presides over the central door surrounded by the people that were present at his agony. Three Lati nwords appear on this facade: Veritas, Vida and Via because Jesus is the Way. The work was completed in 1978. The Last Supper and the Kiss of Judas are sculpted into the facade that is supported by six columns designed to resemble sequoia trunks.

Sagrada Familia in Barcelona Spain

Passion Facade of Sagrada Familia in Barcelona

Kiss of Judas

Passion Facade of Sagrada Familia in Barcelona

Barcelona Spain

Gaudi's Sagrada Familia

The stratospheric magnificence of the ornamentation of the  interior of the church is breath-taking. The ceiling soars with a central vault of sixty meters crowned by Christ ascending into Heaven over the main altar. The Church was consecrated by the Pope in November of 2010 so you can plan your wedding ASAP.

Happy Travels from your friends at www.vino-con-vista.com.

Vino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites

Gaudi's Barcelona Spain

The Ascension of Jesus Christ

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona's Sagrada Familia Church

The Crucifixion of Jesus Christ

Barcelona Spain

Stained Glass in Sagrada Familia

Enhanced by Zemanta

2 Comments

Filed under Antoni Gaudi's Barcelona, Attractions in Barcelona Spain, ebooks, Last Judgment, Park Guell in Barcelona Spain, Peter the Apostle, Safrada Familia Church in Barcelona Spain, Travel and Tourism, UNESCO, UNESCO sites in Barcelona Spain, vino con vista, What is the name of the famous church in Barcelona Spain, What is the name of the famous park in Barcelona, Who designed the famous church in Barcelona Spain, Who designed the famous park in Barcelona Spain?, World Heritage Sites, World Heritage sites in Barcelona Spain

Sumptuous Santa Maria del Mar in Barcelona Spain: Cathedral of the Sea

Gothic Church of Santa Maria del Mar

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona Spain

Barcelona SpainI love the Sumptuous Santa Maria dei Mar cathedral in Barcelona Spain; also known as Cathedral of the Sea in Catalonia.

Catalonia was part of the great Aragonese maritime power and at one time it was one of the most prosperous cities in the Mediterranean. The foundation stone of the church was laid by King Alfonso IV of Aragon and the Catalan Gothic church was built between 1329 and 1383. In 1428 an earthquake destroyed the rose window on the west end of the church. It was replaced in the 15th century with a Gothic window. Outside the church, visit the trendy Passeig del Born with plenty of shopping and Vino con Vista opportunities.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes travel guides at www.vino-con-vista.com.
 

Barcelona Spain Santa Maria del Mar

Enhanced by Zemanta

4 Comments

Filed under Antoni Gaudi's Barcelona, Attractions in Barcelona Spain, Barcelona Spain, Catalon art and architecture in Barcelona, Cathedral of the Sea by Ildefonso Falcones, ebooks, Travel and Tourism, vino con vista, What is the name of the famous church in Barcelona Spain, What is the name of the famous park in Barcelona, Who designed the famous church in Barcelona Spain, Who designed the famous park in Barcelona Spain?

Flamboyant Flamenco: UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Spain

Flamenco in Madrid Spain

Flemenco is a Spanish fusion of music, singing and dance. Ethnic gypsies from Andalusia in southern Spain had a significant impact on the singing (cante), dancing (baile) and guitar playing (toque) that are used in flamenco. Consider it the “Dancing with the Stars” of Spain.

In this genre, voices can be filled with anguish and pain in cante jondo or express happiness and joy through movements in sevillanas and rumbas. Castanets, hand-clapping and foot-stomping create a lively and energetic performance.

Flamenco culture is native to Andalusia.

Flamenco culture is native to Andalusia. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is performed during religious festivals, rituals, ceremonies and celebrations. In November of 2010, UNESCO declared Flamenco one of the masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity which include “traditions, performing arts and practices that are inherited from ancestors and passed on to descendants.”

History and tradition co-exist in the rhythum of tablaos (flamenco stages) and clubs in Madrid where flamenco is very popular. The city offers a wide range of shows and serves as the hub of the record industry that presents this genre to the world.

Corral de la Moreria is one of the oldest Flamenco tablaos in Madrid and has been around since 1956 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfjryeug7FU&feature=related. Another popular venue is Cafe de Chinitas, located in the basement of an 18th century palace. Enjoy the granduer of a Vino con Vista dinner watching flamenco while visiting various regions of Spain.

“The Proclamation of Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity was made by the Director-General of UNESCO starting in 2001 to raise awareness on intangible cultural heritage and encourage local communities to protect them and the local people who sustain these forms of cultural expressions.

Several manifestations of intangible heritage around the world were awarded the title of Masterpieces to recognize the value of the non-material component of culture, as well as entail the commitment of states to promote and safeguard the Masterpieces.

Until 2005, a total of 90 Masterpieces from 70 countries had been proclaimed. 76 more elements were added on 30 September 2009, during the fourth session of the Committee.”

The "Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangi...

The “Masterpieces of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity” is a list maintained by UNESCO with pieces of intangible culture considered relevant by that organization. The map shows the distribution of Masterpieces by State Parties. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Happy Travels from your Travel Buddies @ www.vino-con-vista.comVino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites

Enhanced by Zemanta

6 Comments

Filed under Barcelona Spain, Catalon art and architecture in Barcelona, Easter in Madrid Spain, ebooks, Flamenco Dancing in Spain, Things to do in Madrid Spain, Toledo Spain is a UNESCO site, Travel and Tourism, UNESCO, UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage in SPain, UNESCO sites in Barcelona Spain, vino con vista

Semana Santa in Seductive Segovia Spain: Holy Week and Easter Traditions

Segovia Cathedral • Catedral de Segovia

Segovia Cathedral • Catedral de Segovia (Photo credit: jesuscm)

The present-day Alcázar of Segovia, significan...

Image via Wikipedia

Segovia

Segovia (Photo credit: ferlomu)

Segovia -Ayllón_2 casa del Cordón

Segovia -Ayllón_2 casa del Cordón (Photo credit: ferlomu)

The Ancient Roman aqueduct in Segovia, Spain, ...

The Ancient Roman aqueduct in Segovia, Spain, by Nicolás Pérez. September 2004. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Segovia is a seductive

English: Aqueduct of Segovia, Spain Français :...

English: Aqueduct of Segovia, Spain Français : L’aqueduc de Ségovie, Espagne (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

UNESCO World Heritage Site in Spain that is imbued with the spirit of an old Castillian town. It was declared a UNESCO site in 1985 and it is protected by the Eresma and Clamores Rivers with and impressive collection of historic monuments.

Aqueduct of Segovia

Aqueduct of Segovia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Segovia is less than 50 miles away from Madrid. It is about 3,000 feet above sea level and has an incredibly well-preserved Roman aqueduct that is over 2000 years old. The mortarless Roman Aqueduct is made from granite blocks and was used to carry water from the Sierra de Guadarrama mountains to the city. It is considered to be one of the best civil engineering works in Spain with 166 arches and 120 columns that transported water fro the La Acebeda to the Alcazar, defying the laws of gravity. In 1072, 36 arches were damaged during the attack of Al-Mamun from Toledo. The town also has a fabulous cathedral and historic castle named Alcazar. UNESCO site in Spain

English: Aqueduct in Segovia, Spain Español: A...

Image via Wikipedia

Segovia is a Castilian town in Spain

During Holy Week (Semana Santa), at the base of the Aquaduct, faithful Christians don tunics, capes and pointed hoods for the annual ceremonies. The procession of religious brotherhoods are accompanied by their treasured sacred sculptures of Jesus and Mary.

Semana Santa reaches a climax on Good Friday when faithful adherents of the city’s brotherhoods work their way through the medieval streets to the Cathedral http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=scyPexq0DNk&feature=related.

Segovia  houses an impressive Alcazar fortress/castle with a moat and draw-bridge loaded with plenty of art, stained glass windows and military memorabilia http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iN-YEQX4Ka8.  It was built over the remains of a Roman fortress and became a Royal residence in the 13th century. Climb to the top of the tower to enjoy the magnificent Vino con Vista views of the historic city. The throne room has a beautiful mudejar ceiling www.alcazardesegovia.com.

Segovia Spain

Segovia Spain

Segovia Spain

Segovia Spain

Segovia SpainSegovia Spain

Segovia Spain's Alcazar

Segovia Spain

The 16th century Renaissance-Gothic Cathedral of Santa Maria frames Plaza Mayor and marks the border of th Old Jewish Quarter. It was consecrated in 1768. There are 18 chapels with noteworthy art by Spanish artists like Pedro Berruguete and Sanchez Coello. It has a beautiful altarpiece designed by Sabatini.  Segovia is located in the Castilla and Leon region, a short drive from Madrid.

Segovia SpainSegovia Spain

In Segovia, enjoy some suckling or roasted pig with some of the local white wines from Nieva or the red wines from Valtiendas. The town is also famous for marzipan made by cloister nuns and bakeries.

Happy Easter from your Travel Buddies  @ www.vino-con-vista.com.

Vino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites.
 

Segovia Spain

Segovia Spain

Segovia Spain

Enhanced by Zemanta

9 Comments

Filed under Alcazar in Segovia Spain, ebooks, IPad, Roman Emperors, Rome History, Semana Santa in Segovia, Spanish Art and Architecture, St. Teresa of Avila, Travel and Tourism, UNESCO, vino con vista, Wine, World Heritage Sites, World Heritage sites in Segovia Spain

Holy Week in Majestic Madrid Spain: Semana Santa

Plaza Mayor (square) of Madrid (Spain). At the...

Image via Wikipedia

Fachada de la basílica del monasterio de El Es...

Fachada de la basílica del monasterio de El Escorial, en Madrid. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Courtyard of the Kings and the Basili...

English: Courtyard of the Kings and the Basilica of the Monastery of El Escorial, San Lorenzo of El Escorial, Spain Français : La Cour des Rois et la Basilique du Monastère de l’Escurial, San Lorenzo of El Escorial, Espagne (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Right side of East facade of the Mona...

English: Right side of East facade of the Monastery of El Escorial, , San Lorenzo of El Escorial, Spain Français : Côté droit de la face Est du Monastère de l’Escurial, San Lorenzo of El Escorial, Espagne (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Holy Week  is the last week of Lent and the week before Easter. It includes the religious holidays of Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday (Holy Thursday), Good Friday, and Holy Saturday. Holy Week in Majestic Madrid is a spectacle to behold.In 1561, King Philip II (1556-1598) decided to move his court from Toledo to Madrid. In 1616, King Felipe III ordered the construction of Plaza Mayor to be built upon the former Plaza del Arrabal.

It was designed by Juan Gomez de Mora who used the Madrilenian Baroque Style. The Square contains 136 houses with 437 balconies from which 50,000 people can witness events in the Plaza. In the center, the equestrian statue of Phillip III watches over his masterpiece.

Español: Escultura en El Escorial.

Español: Escultura en El Escorial. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Monastery of San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Spain.

Monastery of San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Spain. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are interesting UNESCO World Heritage sites near Madrid that you should visit. The Royal Seat of San Lorenzo de El Escorial is a historical residence of the king of Spain, in the town of San Lorenzo de El Escorial, about 28 miles northwest of Madrid. It is one of the Spanish royal sites and functions as a monastery, royal palace, museum and a school. The Escorial has a royal monastery  and La Granjilla de La Fresneda, a royal hunting lodge. Originally it was a property of the Hieronymite monks, it is now a monastery of the Order of Saint Augustine.  It is one of several Spanish royal sites and was the residence of the royal family. The palace was designed by King Philip II and architect Juan Bautista de Toledo to serve as a monument to Spain’s central role in the Christian world.

The Palacio Real de Aranjuez

The Palacio Real de Aranjuez (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Detail of the interior of the Royal Palace of ...

Detail of the interior of the Royal Palace of Aranjuez (Community of Madrid, Spain). Español: Detalle del interior del Palacio Real de Aranjuez (Comunidad de Madrid, España). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Another interesting UNESCO site is the Royal Palace of Aranjuez. The landscape around was developed by the Spanish royal family over a course of three centuries and contains innovative horticultural and design ideas. The area was the exclusive property of the royal family until the 19th century when the modern civilian city developed.

Detail of the interior of the Royal Palace of ...

Detail of the interior of the Royal Palace of Aranjuez (Community of Madrid, Spain). Español: Detalle del interior del Palacio Real de Aranjuez (Comunidad de Madrid, España). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

El Escorial.

El Escorial. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here’s a panoramic view of Plaza Mayor http://www.panorammer.com/panoramas/plazamayormadrid_f.php

Madrid has celebrated the events described in the New Testament including the death, crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ since the 15th century. During Semana Santa ( Holy Week) there are many candle-lit processions in Madrid.

On Holy Thursday (Jueves Santo) at the Colegiata de San Isidro, the Virgin Maria Sanrisima de la Esperanza and Jesus del Gran Poder are brought out of the church through the main entrance by the costaleros http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWi3WxSAhPY.

On Good Friday (Viernes Santo) the Nuestro Padre Jesus Nazareno leaves the Basilica del Cristo de Medinaceli in Plaza de Jesus and parades down the Puerta del Sol and Plaza Cibeles. The Procesion del Silencio starts at the Church of Santisimo.

On Domingo Santo (Easter Saturday), the Holy Burial takes place in Plaza Mayor. The culminating activity takes place in the afternoon on Easter Sunday in Plaza Mayor. The Tamborada del Domingo de Resureccion assembles drums to replicate the tremors that occurred when Christ died on the Cross http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XOpQoD9dp4Q&feature=related.

Monasterio de El Escorial Español: Monasterio ...

Monasterio de El Escorial Español: Monasterio de El Escorial. Fachada sur. Deutsch: Südfassade der Schloss- und Klosteranlage Real Sitio de San Lorenzo de El Escorial (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Happy  Easter from your Travel Buddies @ www.vino-con-vista.com.

Vino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites.
 

Enhanced by Zemanta

5 Comments

Filed under Easter in Madrid Spain, Holy Week in Spain Semana Santa, Semana Santa in Madrid Spain

Vino con Vista Vezelay France: The Way of Saint James and the Easter Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela to Spain

Saint James on the middle pier

Saint James on the middle pier (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Catedral de Santiago de Compostela

Catedral de Santiago de Compostela (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Way of St. James (el Camino de Santiago), ...

The Way of St. James (el Camino de Santiago), is the pilgrimage to the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela where legend has it that the remains of the apostle, Saint James the Great. The route was declared the first European Cultural Route by the Council of Europe in October 1987; it was also named one of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites in 1993. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Wayside cross in Laraño, Santiago de ...

English: Wayside cross in Laraño, Santiago de Compostela Galego: Cruceiro en Laraño, Santiago de Compostela (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

St. James's shell, a symbol of the route, on a...

St. James’s shell, a symbol of the route, on a wall in León, Spain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Reliquary with a supposed head of St....

Vezelay is a UNESCO World Heritage Site on the Route of Santiago de Compostela in France. Recently, I traveled to the picturesque Vino con Vista village of Vezelay France in the Yonne department in northern Burgundy where Bourgogne Vezelay is the local wine appellation.

“In the Middle Ages, the village of Vezelay was one of Europe’s most sacred places. In about 1050, local monks claimed they had acquired the miracle-working bones of St Mary Magdalene.

Vezelay

This town has a magnificent Basilica on the route called Santiago de Compostela with the remains of Saint Mary Magdalene. This pilgrimage has been done for centuries by pious pilgrims who converged there from all over Europe throughout the Middle Ages on their way to Santiago de Compostela, at the foot of the St. James the Apostle’s tomb in Spain.

Santiago’s city center is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Praza do Obridorio is a wide city plaza that contains the medieval Cathedral of St. James (also known as Santiago). The Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela is one of the most famous sites for religious pilgrimages in Spain. You can visit the Museo das Pergrinacions (Museum of Pilgrimage). In this town you should also consider a visit to the Museo do Pobo Galego (Museum of Galician People).

Saint James, the brother of St. John the Evangelist,  is the patron saint of Spain. His remains are in Santiago de Compostela in Galicia. His feast day is on July 25th. The traditional pilgrimage to the grave of the saint, known as the “Way of St. James“, has been the most popular pilgrimage for Western European Catholics since the Early Middle Ages.

English: Niederaltaich abbey church ( Lower Ba...

English: Niederaltaich abbey church ( Lower Bavaria ). Fresco at ceiling of the nave: Saint James the Less ( apostle ). Deutsch: Klosterkirche Niederaltaich ( Niederbayern ). Deckenfresco im Langhaus: Apostel Jakobus minor. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

He was the first Apostle to be martyred. It is believed that the completion of the pilgrimage will forgive all of your sins.

St. James pilgrim passport stamps in France on...

St. James pilgrim passport stamps in France on the Via Turenensis (Tours route) for the Chemin de St. Jacques de Compostelle. The World Heritage Sites of the Routes of Santiago de Compostela in France lists the major French towns with stamps. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pilgrimages were an essential part of western European spiritual and cultural life in the Middle Ages. The routes that they took were equipped with facilities for the spiritual and physical well-being of pilgrims. Watch this UNESCO video to better understand this pilgrimage: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/868/video This was the first officially recognized “European Cultural Route” in 1987: the Way of St. James route (The French Way) to Santiago de Compostela in Spain.

 

“The Route of St James of Compostela has preserved the most complete material record in the form of ecclesiastical and secular buildings, settlements both large and small, and civil engineering structures. This Route played a fundamental role in facilitating the two-way interchange of cultural developments between the Iberian Peninsula and the rest of Europe during the Middle Ages.” UNESCO

 

Although there are three basic Christian pilgrimage routes in Europe; the other two pilgrimage routes, to Jerusalem and Rome, are not organized in the same manner.

“In addition to its enormous historical and spiritual value, the route  represents a remarkable display of European artistic and architectural evolution over several centuries. The different pilgrimage routes that converged on Santiago de Compostela, are lined with works of art and architectural creations. The cultural heritage represents the birth of Romanesque art; Gothic cathedrals and  monasteries. The four main pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela in France began at Paris, Vézelay, Le Puy, and Arles respectively, and each of these was fed by a number of subsidiary routes. The French routes include: Regions of Aquitaine, Auvergne, Basse-Normandie, Bourgogne, Centre, Champagne-Ardenne, Ile-de-France, Languedoc-Roussillon, Limousin, Midi-Pyrénées, Picardie, Poitou-Charentes, and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur.

To reach Spain pilgrims had to pass through France, using specific routes with important historical monuments. Here’s a series of pictures of the pilgrimage stops along the routes: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/868/

Here’s the UNESCO inscription:

The Pilgrimage Route of Santiago de Compostela played a key role in religious and cultural exchange and development during the later Middle Ages, and this is admirably illustrated by the carefully selected monuments on the routes followed by pilgrims in France. The spiritual and physical needs of pilgrims travelling to Santiago de Compostela were met by the development of a number of specialized types of edifice, many of which originated or were further developed on the French sections.

After Jerusalem was captured by the Caliph Omar in 638, Christians were hesitant about going to the Holy City as pilgrims. Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, where the tomb of the apostle St James the Great, who brought Christianity to the Iberian peninsula, had been founded around 800, benefited from the decline of Jerusalem as a pilgrimage centre.

Santiago began as a local religious centre, becoming the See of a bishopric around 900, but its renown grew rapidly after the visit in 951 of Godescalc, Bishop of Le Puy and one of the first foreign pilgrims to be recorded. From the 11th century onwards, pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela reached its apogee. Thousands of pilgrims, among them kings and bishops, travelled long distances to pray at the tomb of one of Christ’s closest companions. This flowering coincided with that of the Cluniac Order, which encouraged the worship of relics by publishing Lives of the Saints and Collections of Miracles. From the 11th-13th centuries ‘staging post’ churches developed along the pilgrimage route, and in particular in France.

English: Cruise at Pelamios, Santiago de Compo...

English: Cruise at Pelamios, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia Galego: Cruceiro en Pelamios, Santiago de Compostela, Galiza (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The four main pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela in France began at Paris, Vézelay, Le Puy, and Arles respectively, and each of these was fed by a number of subsidiary routes. Thus, the start of the Paris route saw the convergence of routes from Boulogne, Tournai, and the Low Countries, while routes from Caen, Mont-Saint-Michel, and Brittany joined it at intermediate points such as Tours, Poitiers, Saint-Jean d’Angély and Bordeaux (the port for pilgrims coming by sea from England and coastal areas of Brittany and Normandy). Le Puy was the link with the Rhône valley, whereas those coming from Italy passed through Arles. The three western routes converged at Ostabat, crossing the Pyrenees by means of the Ibaneta pass, while the eastern route from Arles used the Somport pass; the two routes joined in Spain at Puente-la-Reina.

The places of worship along the pilgrimage routes in France range from great structures such as Saint-Sernin at Toulouse or Amiens Cathedral to parish churches. All are included either because they figure on the guide produced by Aymeric Picaud (Saint-Front Cathedral at Périgueux or the Church of Saint-Léonard de-Noblat) or because they contain important relics and other material that connect them directly with the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. Certain churches exhibit architectural characteristics that permit them to be given the appellation of ‘pilgrimage churches’. Sainte-Foy at Conques, Saint-Sernin at Toulouse, and the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela itself in particular have in common large transepts and apsidal chapels ranged round a spacious ambulatory, designed to meet the liturgical needs of pilgrims.

Pilgrimages in the Middle Ages imposed considerable hardships on the pilgrims, such that they were often in need of medical treatment and care. Few of these survive intact on the French sections of the route and are included in the World Heritage site. A number of bridges are known as ‘pilgrims’ bridges’, and that over the Borade at Saint-Chély-d’Aubrac even has the figure of a pilgrim carved on it. Of special importance are the Pont du Diable over the Hérault at Aniane, one of the oldest medieval bridges in France, and the magnificent 14th-century fortified Pont Valentré over the Lot at Cahors.

While the course of the different routes is generally known, very little of them survive in anything approaching their original form. The seven stretches included in the site are all on the Le Puy route, and cover a little over 20% of its total length. These are relatively minor roads whose course has not changed significantly since the Middle Ages; they are also lined with monuments associated with the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, such as crosses and modest places of worship.”

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC

The pilgrimage begins at Romanesque Vezelay Abbey. The Basilica of St. Mary Magdalene Basilique (Sainte-Marie-Madeleine) dominates the hilly Burgundy landscape.

 

Vézelay

Vézelay (Photo credit: gcorret)

Français : Statue de Bernard de Clairvaux, Mai...

Français : Statue de Bernard de Clairvaux, Maison natale de Saint Bernard de Clairvaux, Fontaine-lès-Dijon, Côte-d’Or, Bourgogne,FRANCE (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: louis VII of france

English: louis VII of france (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ascension of Mary Magdalene

Ascension of Mary Magdalene (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Map of the way of St James In Europe

Map of the way of St James In Europe (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mary Magdalene. Lime tree wood and polychromy,...

Mary Magdalene. Lime tree wood and polychromy, 16th century. Part of the feet were restored in the 19th century. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Statues of David and Solomon on the flight of ...

Statues of David and Solomon on the flight of steps leading to the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Spain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Santiago apostle. Palace of Raxoi, Sa...

English: Santiago apostle. Palace of Raxoi, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain) Galego: Apóstolo Santiago, Pazo de Raxoi, Santiago, Galicia (Spain) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bourgogne - Vezelay - Basilique Sainte-Madelei...

Bourgogne – Vezelay – Basilique Sainte-Madeleine – Façade avant (Photo credit: Francis Fantoni)

Santiago de Compostela Cathedral, Galicia, A C...

Santiago de Compostela Cathedral, Galicia, A Coruña, Spain which houses the tomb of St. James son of Zebedee. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

Henry became a Cistercian under the influence ...

Henry became a Cistercian under the influence of Bernard of Clairvaux, shown here in a 13th century illuminated manuscript. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Walk in the footsteps of the pilgrims and the Crusaders at the Vezelay Abbey.  It has a long history of links to the Crusades.

The church was dedicated on April 21, 1104. It became such a popular pilgrimage site that Pope Innocent II extended the narthex to accomodate them in 1132.

Crusaders gathered around Saint Bernard of Clairvaux when he preached for a 2nd Crusade on Easter 1146, in the presence of King Louis VII. Saint Bernard was canonized by Pope Alexander III on January 18, 1174.

 In 1190, Richard I of England (Richard the Lion-Hearted) and Phillip II of France spent three months here before leaving for the 3rd Crusade. The church was sacked by the Huguenots in 1569 and severely damaged during the French Revolution.
 
Vezelay France

Vezelay France

France Summer 2014 069 France Summer 2014 070 France Summer 2014 071 France Summer 2014 072 France Summer 2014 073 France Summer 2014 074 France Summer 2014 075 France Summer 2014 076

Vezelay

Vezelay

France Summer 2014 078 France Summer 2014 079 France Summer 2014 080 France Summer 2014 081 France Summer 2014 082 France Summer 2014 083 France Summer 2014 084 France Summer 2014 085 France Summer 2014 086 France Summer 2014 087 France Summer 2014 088 France Summer 2014 089 France Summer 2014 090 France Summer 2014 091 France Summer 2014 092 France Summer 2014 093 France Summer 2014 094 France Summer 2014 095 France Summer 2014 096 France Summer 2014 097 France Summer 2014 098 France Summer 2014 099 France Summer 2014 100 France Summer 2014 101

Vezelay

Vezelay

France Summer 2014 103 France Summer 2014 104 France Summer 2014 105 France Summer 2014 106 France Summer 2014 107 France Summer 2014 108 France Summer 2014 109 France Summer 2014 110 France Summer 2014 111 France Summer 2014 112 France Summer 2014 113 France Summer 2014 114 France Summer 2014 115 France Summer 2014 116 France Summer 2014 117 France Summer 2014 118 France Summer 2014 119

The church became a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1979. In 1987, the European Union declared the Camino de Santiago to be the first European Cultural Itinerary.

English: Saint Bernard of Clairvaux - Sint Ber...

English: Saint Bernard of Clairvaux – Sint Bernardusstraat, Maastricht, The Netherlands. By Jean Sondeijker, 1946. Nederlands: Sint Bernardus van Clairvaux – Sint Bernardusstraat, Maastricht. Door Jean Sondeijker, 1946. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 
 
 
 
Vézelay’s hilltop location made it an obvious site for a town since ancient times. In the 9th century the Benedictines were given land to build a monastery. According to legend, not long before the end of the first millennium, a monk named Baudillon brought relics (bones) of Mary Magdalene to Vézelay from Saint-Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume

 

 

 

 

When you climb the hill to the Basilica you will notice the shells on the street. Climb the crest to the summit of the hill climbed by  millions of pilgrims as they make their way to Compostella Spain to venerate the remains of St. James, the Apostle. For more than a thousand years, pilgrims have walked the Camino de Santiago (Way of St. James), “seeking penance, enlightenment, and adventure.” Santiago de Compostela was proclaimed the first European Cultural itinerary by the Council of Europe in 1987. There are about 1,800 historic buildings along the route.

The shells on the street indicate that this is the Way of Saint James; the Camino de Santiago. Four major routes through France lead to the Spanish Cathedral in Galicia including: Paris through Tours (Via Turonensis), Vézelay (Via Lemovicensis) and Le Puy-en-Velay.

When I climbed the steep slope to the magnificent church, I saw many pilgrims on their way into

Abbatiale de Vézelay, Bourgogne, France : nart...

Abbatiale de Vézelay, Bourgogne, France : narthex, tympan de droite (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

the Basilica. When I entered the church, they had congregated in the narthex under the central tympanum and began praying. The tympanum depicts a benevolent Christ with arms wide open, flanked on both sides by his Apostles conveying his message to them. He is sending the Crusaders out; they were guaranteed remission of their sins if they participated in the Crusades.

 

I followed the pilgrims  into the church where they walked over to the staircase next to the statue of Saint Mary Magdelene. When they walked down the stairs, they arrived at her shrine with her relics. They began praying and singing. Although I have been to Lourdes and Fatima, I can honestly say that this was one of the most moving spiritual displays of faith that I have ever witnessed.

 

France, Abbey of la Madaleine Vezelay, 12th ce...

France, Abbey of la Madaleine Vezelay, 12th century tympanum, Romanesque sculpture. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Saint Mary Magdalene was recognized by early church fathers as “the apostle to the apostles”. According to the Gospel, she “stood in the presence of the risen Jesus and went to tell the other disciples the news of the Resurrection”.

Shortly after its foundation in the 9th century, the Cluniac Benedictine abbey of Vezelay acquired the relics of St. Mary Magdalene and has been an important pilgrimage ever since. Her relics were transfered from her sepulchre in the Dominican oratory of Saint Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume at Aix en Provence to protect them from the Saracens. In 1058, Pope Stephen IX, confirmed the authenticity of the relics, leading to an influx of pilgrims that has continued to this day.

 

¨raza das Praterias; cathedral of Santiago de ...

¨raza das Praterias; cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Spain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNESCO:

“The tradition whereby the Apostle St James the Great preached the Gospel in Spain dates from the early 7th century. In the Latin Breviary of the Apostles, St Jerome held that apostles were buried where they preached, and so it was assumed that the body of St James had been moved from Jerusalem, where according to the Acts of the Apostles he was martyred on the order of Herod Agrippa, to a final resting place in Spain. It was not until the 9th century that the apostle’s tomb was identified at Compostela. The late 8th century saw the consolidation of the Christian kingdom of Galicia and Asturias in northern Spain, with the support of Charlemagne. It was to provide the base for the reconquest of the peninsula from Muslim domination, a process that was not to be completed until 1492. The apostle had been adopted as its patron saint by the Christian kingdom. In the early years of the 9th century, during the reign of Alfonso II, his tomb was ‘discovered’ in a small shrine by the hermit Pelayo and Todemiro, bishop of the most westerly diocese in the kingdom.”

“There are two access routes into Spain from France, entering at Roncesvalles (Valcarlos Pass) and Canfranc (Somport Pass) respectively; they merge west of Pamplona, just before Puente la Reina. It passes through 166 towns and villages, and it includes over 1,800 buildings of historic interest; in many cases the modern road runs parallel to the ancient route. The tradition of pilgrimage to Santiago has not ceased since that time, although its popularity waned in recent centuries. Since it was declared to be the first European Cultural Itinerary by the Council of Europe in 1987, however, it has resumed the spiritual role that it played in the Middle Ages, and every year sees many thousands of pilgrims following it on foot or bicycle.” UNESCO

 

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC

 

UNESCO Historical Description

“The tradition whereby the apostle St James the Great preached the gospel in Spain dates from the early 7th century, in the Latin Breviary of the Apostles. St Jerome held that apostles were buried where they preached, and so it was assumed that the body of St James had been moved from Jerusalem, where according to the Acts of the Apostles, he was martyred on the order of Herod Agrippa, to a final resting place in Spain.

It was not until the 9th century that the apostle’s tomb was identified at Compostela. The late 8th century saw the consolidation of the Christian kingdom of Galicia and Asturias in northern Spain, with the support of Charlemagne. It was to provide the base for the reconquest of the peninsula from Muslim domination, a process that was not to be completed until 1492. The apostle had been adopted as its patron saint by the Christian kingdom, and in the early years of the 9th century, during the reign of Alfonso II, his tomb was “discovered” in a small shrine by the hermit Pelayo and Todemiro, Bishop of the most westerly diocese in the kingdom.

The fame of the tomb of St James, protector of Christendom, quickly spread across western Europe and it became a place of pilgrimage, comparable with Jerusalem and Rome. By the beginning of the 10th century pilgrims were coming to Spain on the French routes from Tours, Limoges, and Le Puy, and facilities for their bodily and spiritual welfare began to be endowed along what gradually became recognized as the formal pilgrimage route, whilst in Compostela itself a magnificent new basilica was built to house the relics of the apostle, along with other installations – churches, chapels, hospices, and hospitals. The 12th century saw the Route achieve its greatest influence, used by thousands of pilgrims from all over Western Europe. In 1139 the first “guidebook” to the Route appeared, in the form of Book V of the Calixtine Codex (attributed to Pope Calixtus II but most probably the work of the pilgrim Ayrneric Picaud), describing its precise alignment from Roncesvalles to Santiago de Compostela and listing the facilities available to pilgrims. These structures, ranging from humble chapels and hospices to magnificent cathedrals, represent every aspect of artistic and architectural evolution from Romanesque to Baroque and beyond, demonstrating the intimate linkages between faith and culture in the Middle Ages. The establishment of the pilgrimage route inevitably led to its adoption as a commercial route, resulting in economic prosperity for several of the towns along its length.

The tradition of pilgrimage to Santiago has not ceased since that time, though its popularity waned in recent centuries. Since it was declared to be the first European Cultural Itinerary by the Council of Europe in 1987, however, it has resumed the spiritual role that it played in the Middle Ages, and every year sees many thousands of pilgrims following it on foot or bicycle.”

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Tympan (externe) de l'abbatiale de Vézelay

Tympan (externe) de l’abbatiale de Vézelay (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

2 Comments

Filed under Italy Travel Guides, Vino con Vista Vezelay France on the UNESCO Route: The Way of Saint James is the Camino de Santiago to Spain

Elaborate Holy Week and Easter Rituals in Toledo Spain: Semana Santa

English: A five-segment panorama of the Tagus ...

English: A five-segment panorama of the Tagus River in Toledo, Spain. Taken with a Canon 5D and 24-105mm f/4L lens. Français : Vue panoramique du Tage à Tolède, en Espagne. Panorama obtenu en assemblant 5 clichés faits avec un appareil Canon 5D et un objectif 24-105mm f/4L. Română: O panoramă alcătuită din cinci fotografii a râului Tagus din Toledo, Spania. Realizată cu un Canon 5D şi obiectiv de 24-105mm f/4L. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bridge of Alcántara.

Image via Wikipedia

English: Toledo, Puerta de Bisagro

English: Toledo, Puerta de Bisagro (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: House of El Greco (partial view) : To...

English: House of El Greco (partial view) : Toledo, Spain. Español: Casa de El Greco (vista parcial) : Toledo, España (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Visit the historical city of Toledo Spain during Holy Week or on Easter. The charming UNESCO World Heritage City of Toledo Spain is the Toledo Spainrepository of more than 2000 years of history and architectural styles.  Toletum was the capital of Roman Carpetania.  It is an outstanding Vino con Vista destination, especially during Easter ceremonies. Toledo was declared a World Heritage Site in 1986. Corpus Christi Week is the most important holiday in Toledo when the ground is covered with rosemary and thyme.

World Heritage Site Toledo Spain

The Mudejar architectural style of the Middle Ages, arose from the multi-cultural  interplay of forces among the three major religious groups who lived there: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Toledo has a broad spectrum of structures from the medieval period including walls and fortified buildings like San Servando Castle.  The former capital of Spain is about 42 miles southwest of Spain‘s newer capital city of Madrid. Felipe II transferred the Royal Court to Madrid in 1561.

The Assumption of the Virgin

The Assumption of the Virgin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Panorama of the Toledo skyline in Spain, at su...

Panorama of the Toledo skyline in Spain, at sunset. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The River Tagus loops around the historical gems of this fortified city and is crowned with gorgeous historic bridges. The Alcazar fortress occupies the highest point of the city and was used as a military base and fortress by the Romans, Arabs and Christians. Ultimately, it became the residence of King Alfonso VI and then Carlos V converted the building into a Royal Palace. Each facade of the fortress is different and reflects different architectural eras: The east facde is Medieval and the facade on the west is Renaissance. It houses the Army and Military Museum.

Toledo Spain

Coat of Arms

Toledo Spain

Toledo Spain

The Primal See in Toledo was using an old Mosque which was reconsecrated as the main church in 1086 by Alfonso VI. The Primada Cathedral was built between 1226 and 1493 on the site of a VIsigoth church. The Gothic Cathedral‘s first stone was ceremoniously laid in 1221. The Cathedral is brimming with art treasures and has a valuable collection of El Greco and Goya masterpieces.  Visit the beautiful chapels and the Renaissance Choir. The cathedral that was originally started in the sixth century by San Eugenio, the first Bishop of Toledo, was converted into a mosque that became the main church before the Gothic Cathedral was built.

Toledo Spain

Toledo Spain

El Greco is one of Spain’s most revered Renaissance artists. In March of 1586 he obtained the commission for The Burial of the Count of Orgaz. In 2014, the 400th anniversary of his death was celebrated with special exhibitions in Toledo.

Detail of the painting.

Detail of the painting. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

El Greco - The Burial of the Count of Orgaz (d...

El Greco – The Burial of the Count of Orgaz (detail) – WGA10487 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

El Greco - The Burial of the Count of Orgaz (d...

El Greco – The Burial of the Count of Orgaz (detail) – WGA10490 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

El Greco self-portrait, 1604

El Greco self-portrait, 1604 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

His 1586 masterpiece “El Entierro del Conde de Orgaz” (translates into the Burial of the Count of Orgaz) is located at the foot of the church of Santo Tome. The painting portrays Saint Augustine and Saint Steven in elegant golden vestments. They are preparing to  carry his life-less body to his tomb. The young boy holding the torch on the bottom left of the painting is El Greco’s son. The bearded gentleman directly above Saint Stephen is a self-portrait of El Greco.

The Holy Trinity, 1577–1579, by El Greco

The Holy Trinity, 1577–1579, by El Greco (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One of my favorite El Greco paintings in Toledo is “The Tears of Saint Peter”  which is displayed in the Studio of his Museum in Toledo. Tour the charming House and Museum of El Greco in Toledo Spain during Semana Santa. El Greco never lived in this place, but the house has a collection of his paintings. Another one of my favorite El Greco paintings is “Jesus Carrying the Cross.”

El Greco, The Burial of the Count of Orgaz

El Greco, The Burial of the Count of Orgaz (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Toledo Spain

Toledo Spain

Toledo, the  former capital of Spain, sits majestically on a hilltop in the Castilla- La Mancha region immortalized by Miguel de Cervante’s famous “Don Quixote.”

Toledo Spain

Puerta del Sol Toledo Spain Toledo is 70 km so...

Puerta del Sol Toledo Spain Toledo is 70 km south of Madrid. It is the capital of the province of Toledo and declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986 for its extensive cultural and monumental heritage as one of the former capitals of the Spanish , España Empire. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Toledo was the temporary seat of Emperor Charles V. He endowed the city with the status of an imperial, crowned city. The fervor and devotion of Holy Week traditions of Semana Santa de Toledo are reminicient of 16th century Spanish traditions. Processions with residents dressed in hooded costumes signify the death and mourning of Jesus Christ. These solemn processions throughout the town during Holy Week, tell the story of the Passion and resurrection of Christ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4FCEnOPlng.

Detalle de Gonzalo Ruiz de Toledo en la pintur...

Detalle de Gonzalo Ruiz de Toledo en la pintura El entierro del conde de Orgaz de El Greco (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cambrón Gate, Toledo, Spain Français : Porte d...

Cambrón Gate, Toledo, Spain Français : Porte de Cambrón, Tolède, Espagne (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Semana Santa is a very special time in Spain http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yOHWjOBYJY&feature=related.

Happy Easter from your Travel Buddies @ www.vino-con-vista.com.

Toledo -Guadamur -castillo_3

Toledo -Guadamur -castillo_3 (Photo credit: ferlomu)

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

7 Comments

Filed under Easter in Toledo Spain, ebooks, IPad, Roman Emperors, Semana Santa in Spain, Spanish Art and Architecture, Toledo Spain, Travel and Tourism, UNESCO, UNESCO sites in Barcelona Spain, vino con vista, World Heritage Sites

Chicago’s Columbus Day Parade 2015

Painting of Christopher Columbus. The painting...

Image via Wikipedia

Attend the annual Columbus Day Parade in Chicago. The parade celebrates the historic 1492 voyage of Christopher Columbus as well as Italian-American Culture. Columbus is from Genoa Italy. Here’s a Genoa Video for all my Italian friends on Columbus Day http://youtu.be/wujacerrsp8

The annual Columbus Day Parade celebrates Christopher Columbus’ historic voyage to America and Italian-American culture. The parade will be on State Street from Wacker to Van Buren.

 

When: October 15, 2015 at 12:30 p.m.

 

Columbus Before the Queen.

Columbus Before the Queen. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Statue of "Christopher Columbus" fir...

Statue of “Christopher Columbus” first dispalyed-published 1933. Grant Park, Chicago. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Christopher Columbus ( 1451 –1506) was an explorer, colonizer  and navigator. He was born in the Republic of Genoa, in northwestern Italy.

English: The routes of the four voyages of Col...

English: The routes of the four voyages of Columbus. Español: Rutas seguidas por Colón en sus cuatro viajes. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Columbus_1892_Issue-$5.jpg Christophe...

English: Columbus_1892_Issue-$5.jpg Christopher columbus” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The event is celebrated as Columbus Day in the United States. It is celebrated in many countries around the world: Día de la Raza in many countries in Latin America; Discovery Day in the Bahamas; Día de la Hispanidad and Fiesta Nacional in Spain and as Día de las Américas (Day of the Americas) in Uruguay.

Christoper Columbus arrives in America

Christoper Columbus arrives in America (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com.

Enhanced by Zemanta

1 Comment

Filed under Attractions in Chicago, Authentic Italian Restaurants in Chicago, Columbus Day Parade in Chicago 2011

Host a Holiday Vino con Vista Wine and Cheese Tasting Party

English: Goat's milk cheese

English: Goat’s milk cheese (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Photo of a vineyard in the Loire Valley, France.

Photo of a vineyard in the Loire Valley, France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

French red wine from the Loire Valley region o...

French red wine from the Loire Valley region of Chinon. Predominately Cabernet franc. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you are planning a party, you may be interested in some of my favorite wine and cheese pairings.

Wine and goat cheese are a wonderful combination; I have included 3 goat cheese selections.

Cheeses

Cheeses (Photo credit: Smabs Sputzer)

Take the cheese out of the refrigerator and unwrap the pieces to bring them to room temperature; this will fully develop their flavor. Present them on separate cheese boards or plates with one cheese knife for each variety. Displaying their names on a card near the board. Use glass domes for exceptionally fragrant, ripe cheeses so they don’t overwhelm the less fragrant selections.

Variety of cheeses on serving platter

Variety of cheeses on serving platter (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Here are some of my favorite wine and cheese pairings for you to try:

Vineyard near the French wine region of Chinon...

Vineyard near the French wine region of Chinon in the Loire Valley (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Le Chevre Noir goat cheese is hard and crumbly and pairs with a Chinon Loire Valley red wine. Aged chevre, typically dry, rich and intense, also works with classic heavy reds like Cabernet Sauvignon.

Chevre Noir

Chevre Noir (Photo credit: Renée S.)

Chevre Noir

Chevre Noir (Photo credit: euqus)

A wine cave in the Loire Valley wine region of...

A wine cave in the Loire Valley wine region of Chinon. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Loire Valley

Loire Valley (Photo credit: lightmagic)

Chevreau a flan de coline

Chevreau a flan de coline (Photo credit: Erminig Gwenn)

Drunken Goat was a farmhouse accident. A wheel of chesse rolls into a barrel of wine and the rest is history. This semi-pasteurized goat cheese is from Spain’s Mediterranean Coast. It pairs with a smooth Spanish Red Tempranillo.

Tempranillo varietal wine bottle and glass, sh...

Tempranillo varietal wine bottle and glass, showing colour Shot with Nikon D70s (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Truffle Tremor pasteurized goat cheese from Cypress Grove Creamery is made with black truffles. It pairs with a fruity Pinot Noir.

Comte cow cheese from Fort Saint Antoine in the Jura Mountains. Comte pairs with a big chewy California Cabernet Sauvignon red wine. Buy some Kronos Vineyard Napa Valley Corison if you can.

Corison

Corison

Happy Holidays from Vino con Vista

Happy Holidays from Vino con Vista

Thirty minutes before guests arrive, uncork the wine to give them time to aerate and develop their flavors and bouquets.

English: Cropped image of Cabernet Sauvignon g...

English: Cropped image of Cabernet Sauvignon grapes from Hedges Vineyards in Red Mountain, Washington. Photo taken August 28th, 2007 with a Kodak z650 camera. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Add some grapes, olives, pears, cured meats, breads, crackers, plain almonds and cashews and dried fruits like figs, dates and apricots to your table. Use your treasured holiday corkscrews and dishware!

Distribute antlers and hats to your friends for the event!!

Holiday Party

Holiday Party

If you are hosting a seasonal party, cover your serving table with your favorite seasonal table cloth. Make a fabulous holiday centerpiece with candlesticks: http://youtu.be/8aMRzDHYgb0. I prefer my crystal candlesticks with silver candles. Crank up the holiday music and enjoy the party.

Vintage Ornament Center Piece

Vintage Ornament Center Piece

Leave room for Holiday Cookies.

Club 2014 xmas 020

Club 2014 xmas 021

Happy Holidays from www.vino-con-vista.com

Goat cheese from Berry, France

Goat cheese from Berry, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Enhanced by Zemanta

2 Comments

Filed under Host a Holiday Wine and Cheese Party