EVOLVE is the Annual Fundraiser at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago

The Field Museum Muses

Neoclassical Inspiration: The Erechtheum and other Grecian and Roman Temple

See more images of the Grecian elements of the Field Museum’s architecture.

Botany, Low Relief Panel by Henry Hering, Winged female figure holding plants, fruits and flowers.

Geology, Low Relief Panel by Henry Hering, Winged female figure holding a globe with North and South American continents and a torch representing fire. 

Zoology, Low Relief Panel by Henry Hering, Winged female figure holding a horned animal skull. 

The Muses

Located at each corner of Stanley Field Hall, the four muses depict the purposes for which The Field Museum was founded.

© The Field Museum, CSGN40272© The Field Museum, CSGN40270

 

EVOLVE is the premier annual fundraiser at the Field Museum.

Each year hundreds of young professionals flock to Stanley Field Hall for cocktails and food.

WHEN: Saturday, October 22nd

Founded in 1983 as the Columbian Museum of Chicago, the Field Museum is home to Sue, the largest, most complete, and best preserved Tyrannosaurus rex fossil yet discovered.
Come see the legendary Lions of Tsavo, who killed more nearly 140 people in Kenya in 1898.
Visit Bushman, one of the most famous primates ever, a lowland gorilla who once lived right here in Chicago at our very own Lincoln Park Zoo.
Walk through Ancient Egypt, explore the Ancient Americas or see the beauty in the Grainger Hall of Gems. The Field Museum in Chicago has it all.

© The Field Museum, CSGN40496


History of the Museum from https://www.fieldmuseum.org/about/history/architecture

In 1905, The Field Museum was in dire need of a permanent home. Its original building, the Palace of Fine Arts from the World’s Columbian Exposition, was rapidly deteriorating. Contained within “The 1909 Burnham Plan for Chicago,” the plans for the new building were controversial both because of the proposed location and the style of the architecture. Burnham initially planned to place the museum on Congress Street in the center of Grant Park. Opposition arose to having any buildings in the park, and a legal battle that went all the way to the Illinois Supreme Court moved the museum’s proposed location. They initially decided to rebuild the museum in Jackson Park, and the steel and marble were delivered to the site in anticipation of construction. The plan was changed again when the South Park Commission reacquired land just south of Grant Park, and the museum was ultimately built at its present location just south of Roosevelt Road. Construction on the new building began on July 26, 1915. In 1918, the plans for the Museum were altered to allow the Museum to act as a hospital during World War I. Though the Board of Trustees reluctantly gave in to the agreement, the government cancelled the contract before any recovering soldiers were ever seen at the Field. More information on the Museum’s brief relationship with the military can be found at the Biodiversity Heritage Library.

Construction took almost six years to complete and cost approximately $7,000,000. The foundation alone took one year, and extends down 95 feet in some places. When it was first constructed, the building was made of 350,000 cubic feet of white Georgia marble and covered 20 acres of floor space. On May 2, 1921, the Field Museum was reopened to the public. Since that time, many additions have been made to the Museum’s floor plan, most notably the 2005 construction of the Collection’s Resource Center which added 186,000 square feet on two under-ground levels. The Museum’s exhibition space occupies over 480,000 square feet on the Ground, Main and Upper levels.  Stanley Field Hall itself accounts for a half an acre of floor space, with a length of 300 feet and a width of 70 feet. The Hall’s floor is comprised of 300 million year old fossilized limestone.

Neoclassical Inspiration: The Erechtheum and other Grecian and Roman Temples

See more images of the Grecian elements of the Field Museum’s architecture.

Botany, Low Relief Panel by Henry Hering, Winged female figure holding plants, fruits and flowers.

Geology, Low Relief Panel by Henry Hering, Winged female figure holding a globe with North and South American continents and a torch representing fire. 

Zoology, Low Relief Panel by Henry Hering, Winged female figure holding a horned animal skull. 

The Muses

Located at each corner of Stanley Field Hall, the four muses depict the purposes for which The Field Museum was founded.

 

 

 “Mr. Marshall Field announced that he would contribute the sum of $1,000,000 for the initial establishment of the museum.Other contributors promptly appeared. George M. Pullman and Harlow N. Higinbotham each subscribed $100,000. Other contributors of funds included Mrs. Mary D. Sturges, the McCormick Estate, P. D. Armour, Martin A. Ryerson, R. T. Crane, A. A. Sprague and many other leading citizens. Their contributions, together with donations of exposition stock, totaled nearly one-half million dollars by the end of the following year.

These funds enabled purchases to be made of large collections or important exhibits that had been shown at the exposition. Such purchases included those the War natural history collection, the Tiffany collection of gems, the collection of pre-Columbian gold ornaments, the Hassler ethnological collection from Paraguay, collections representing Javanese, Samoan and Peruvian ethnology, and the Hagenbeck collection of about 600 ethnological objects from Africa, the South Sea Islands, British Columbia, et cetera.” (official website)

SUE the T.rex fossil skeleton

History



 

Participating Vineyards & Chateaux
Beaulieu Vineyard (BV) Castello Banfi Caymus Vineyards Damilano Hess Collection J. Lohr Louis M. Martini Marqués de Riscal Merryvale Vineyards PerryMoore Rocca delle Macìe Roederer Estate St. Supéry Wente Yalumba
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Participating Restaurants
III Forks, 676 Restaurant & Bar, Acadia, AI Japanese Restaurant & Lounge, Argent Restaurant & Raw Bar, Atwood Café, Bistronomic, Black Dog Gelato  Café des Architectes, Chicago Coffee & Teas, Chicago Prime Meats, Coco Pazzo, Davanti Enoteca, deca Restaurant Fogo de Chao Francesca’s Restaurants
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Chicago Architecture Foundation Gala 2017 Make No Small Plans

The Harold Washington Library in downtown Chic...

The Harold Washington Library in downtown Chicago. Taken by Douglas Kaye, 2005. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

John J. Glessner House, Chicago, Illinois (1885)

John J. Glessner House, Chicago, Illinois (1885) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Get Tickets for the Chicago Architecture Foundation’s 2017 GALA

No Small Plans

“CAF is a nonprofit cultural organization with tours, exhibitions, programs and events for all ages. Our mission is to inspire people to discover why design matters.

“The Chicago Architecture Foundation (CAF) was founded in 1966 to save the historic Glessner House. Since then, CAF has grown to become one of the largest cultural organizations in Chicago. For more than 50 years, our 450 volunteer docents and our educators have shared the stories of Chicago architecture with millions of Chicagoans and visitors. In 2016, CAF served more than 670,000 people.”

Glessner House in 1887 as construction is bein...

Glessner House in 1887 as construction is being completed. Original photo from Cornell University Library. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Visit CAF at 224 S. Michigan Ave. to view the 1,000-building scale model of Chicago, shop in our award-winning store, or participate in a fun family event in our ArcelorMittal Design Studio. Or choose from 85 tours by boat, walking, bus, or even L train. Tours depart daily and are led by CAF’s expert docents. Every October, check out CAF’s free annual Open House Chicago festival.”

Palmette motifs from A handbook of Ornament by...

Palmette motifs from A handbook of Ornament by Franz Meyer (1898) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The 2017 Chicago Architecture Foundation Gala, No Small Plans, will take place on Thursday, April 6, at Morgan MFG in the West Loop. Proceeds from the Gala will benefit CAF’s education initiatives for Chicago students.

Date
April 6, 2017
Time
6:00 pm
Price
$500 Individual Ticket
$5,000 and up for tables and sponsorships

acroteria

What is a acroteria?

The pedestal and sculpture at the top and lower sides of a triangular pediment; originally found in ancient Classical buildings.

In this case, the

 

Harold Washington Library

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Graceland Cemetery in Chicago

English: The Louis Sullivan designed Martin Ry...

English: The Louis Sullivan designed Martin Ryerson Tomb (1889). This Egyptian Revival style mausoleum is located in Chicago’s Graceland Cemetery. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Graceland Cemetery is a large, beautifully landscaped cemetery located at 4001 N. Clark Street at Irving in Chicago. It was established in 1860 by Thomas Bryan when he purchased the original 80 acres. Graceland is one of three notable 19th century cemeteries which were previously well outside the city limits; the other two being Rosehill and Oak Woods (South of Hyde Park) which includes a major monument to Confederate civil war dead.

Graceland is considered the “Cemetery of Architects” with notables like:

Daniel H. Burnham, William Holabird, John Wellborn Root, Howard Van Doren Shaw, Louis Sullivan, David Adler, George Elmslie, William Le Baron Jenney, Father of the American skyscraper and Bruce Graham, architect of John Hancock building and Sears Tower (now called the Willis Tower), Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

 

Prior to the 1871 Chicago Fire, Lincoln Park was the city’s cemetery. The edge of the pond around Daniel Burnham‘s burial island, was lined with broken headstones after the fire.

Lincoln Park became a recreational area, with a single mausoleum remaining, the “Couch tomb”, containing the remains of Ira Couch. The Couch Tomb is one of oldest structures in the City that wasn’t destroyed by the Great Chicago Fire.

For more information visit: www.gracelandcemetery.org

The cemetery’s walls are topped off with wrought iron spear point fencing. Many of the cemetery’s tombs are of great architectural or artistic interest, including the Getty Tomb, the Martin Ryerson Mausoleum (both designed by architect Louis Sullivan), and the Schoenhofen Pyramid Mausoleum. The industrialist George Pullman was buried at night, in a lead-lined coffin within an elaborately reinforced steel-and-concrete vault, to prevent his body from being exhumed and desecrated by labor activists.

Visit the mausoleum of Potter Palmer and Bertha Honoré Palmer. There are two incredible statues by sculptor Lorado Taft, Eternal Silence for the Graves family plot and The Crusader that marks Victor Lawson‘s final resting place.

The cemetery is also the final resting place of Marshall Field, businessman, retailer, whose memorial was designed by Henry Bacon, with sculpture by Daniel Chester French and several victims of the tragic Iroquois Theater fire in which more than 600 people died.

 

 

 

English: The Louis Sullivan designed Martin Ry...

English: The Louis Sullivan designed Martin Ryerson Tomb (1889). This Egyptian Revival style mausoleum is located in Chicago’s Graceland Cemetery. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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The Wines of Vino con Vista Provence: Chateauneuf-du-Pape in Vaucluse France

Français : Chateau de Chateauneuf du Pape, Vau...

Français : Chateau de Chateauneuf du Pape, Vaucluse, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Fêtes de la Véraison à Chateauneuf ...

Français : Fêtes de la Véraison à Chateauneuf du Pape, Vaucluse, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Clocher de l'église de Chateauneuf ...

Français : Clocher de l’église de Chateauneuf du Pape, Vaucluse, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: The Castle of Chateauneuf-du-Pape, su...

English: The Castle of Chateauneuf-du-Pape, summer residence the popes. It is also the city which produces one of the best wine in France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Vineyard in Chateauneuf du Pape, Vauc...

English: Vineyard in Chateauneuf du Pape, Vaucluse, France Français : Vignoble de Chateauneuf du Pape, Vaucluse, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Several French wines from the southern Rhone w...

Several French wines from the southern Rhone wine region all featuring the embossed papal crest that are unique to wine bottles from Chateauneuf du Pape. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: 17th-century engraving of Pope John XXII.

English: 17th-century engraving of Pope John XXII. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A rocky vineyard with lots of large galet ston...

A rocky vineyard with lots of large galet stones that has become emblematic of the French wine region of Chateauneuf-du-pape (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Bouteille de Chateauneuf du Pape rouge

Français : Bouteille de Chateauneuf du Pape rouge (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Clement VII, Pope of Avignon from 1378 to 1394...

Clement VII, Pope of Avignon from 1378 to 1394, in Musée de Petit Palais in Avignon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Odoric of Pordenone and Pope John XXI...

English: Odoric of Pordenone and Pope John XXII. Français : Odoric de Pordenone et pape Jean XXII. Русский: Одорико Порденоне и Иоанн XXII (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Muscats de Beaumes de Venise Blanc ...

Français : Muscats de Beaumes de Venise Blanc et Rosé (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vineyard in the Aix-en-Provence wine region.

Vineyard in the Aix-en-Provence wine region. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Located along the Southern Rhone Valley, some of the appellations in Provence include:

Muscat de Beaumes-de Venise, Tavel, Gigondas and Chateauneuf-du-Pape (new castle of the Pope) on the east bank north of Avignon.

Chateauneuf-du-Pape wine is a blend of up to 13 grapes, mostly Grenache, Mourvedre and Syrah.

Pope John XXII, the “Wine Pope”, built his summer chateau north of Avignon in 1318. He was the Pope from 1316 until his death in 1334. He canonized St. Thomas Aquinas during his papacy. Visit his Papal Chateau. You can also visit the Musee des Outils de Vignerons near the Chateau with a tasting room: www.brotte.com

Under John XXII, the wines of this area came to be known as “Vin du Pape; which evolved to Châteauneuf-du-Pape.”

John XXII was the second Avignon Pope; the first Pope to live in Avignon was French-born Pope Clement V. The Avignon Papacy hosted 8 popes and

Français : Vue générale de Chateauneuf du Pape...

Français : Vue générale de Chateauneuf du Pape, Vaucluse, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

lasted for 70 years. These popes promoted viticulture on the banks of the Rhone River.

Today, the 7000 acres on the Rhone’s east Bank, north of Avignon is famous for chewy, majestic red wine.

Here are some Production Statistics from the official website:

area 3200 hectares
– 5 towns: Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Courthézon Bédarrides Sorgue, Orange

– Average yield: 31 hl / ha
– 90.000 to 105.000 hectoliters of average annual production
– 320 winegrowers
– 5% of the production is vinified by a cooperation cellar
– 95% of red wines are produced, 5% white
– 12.5 °: minimum natural alcohol content by volume

Schedule a visit to Vinadea www.vinadea.com, the wine-tourisn hub showcasing the Chateauneuf-du-Pape appellation with tastings in a historic former coach house.

VINADÉA

Maison des vins de Châteauneuf-du-Pape
8 rue maréchal Foch – BP 68
84232 Châteauneuf-du-Pape cedex
Tél: +33 (0) 4 90 83 70 69
http://www.vinadea.com
E-mail: vinadea@chateauneuf.com

Click here for more information: http://en.chateauneuf.com/wine-tourism

Français : La grand rue de Chateauneuf-du-Pape

Français : La grand rue de Chateauneuf-du-Pape (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Here’s a wine map:

Rhône Valley / Southern: A detailed look at appellations including Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Gigondas and Vacqueyras, as well as the Côtes du Rhône and named Côtes du Rhône-Villages

In the glass in partial view is the Hubert Lig...

In the glass in partial view is the Hubert Lignier Gevrey-Chambertin 2003. French wine from the Cote de Nuits region of Burgundy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Rhonesouthmap.pdf

For more information on Rhone Wines visit:

http://www.rhone-wines.com/?chooseLanguage=false

Pope John XXII, elected by the conclave, retai...

Pope John XXII, elected by the conclave, retained the papacy in Avignon and was not a relative of Clement V (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Most of the Rose wine comes from the Cote de Provence between Nice and Aix-en-Provence. Tavel produces the  most famous Rose, located 8 miles west of Chateauneuf-du-Pape.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Wine-growing areas of Provence

Wine-growing areas of Provence (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Wine Spectator’s List of Maps of the Major Wine Regions in Vino con Vista France

Français : Les vignobles de la Côte de Beaune

Français : Les vignobles de la Côte de Beaune (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vineyards in the French wine region of the Rho...

Vineyards in the French wine region of the Rhone valley. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Les vignobles de la vallée du Rhône

Les vignobles de la vallée du Rhône (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I found this list on Wine Spectator; an overview of France’s major wine regions including: Alsace, Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, Languedoc, Loire Valley, Provence and Rhône Valley. On their website you can view the following interactive maps:

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Francemap.pdf

Alsace A detailed look at the appellation’s top crus, broken out by town and the corresponding vineyard

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Alsacemap.pdf

Bordeaux A detailed look at the region’s key districts, including the Médoc and its appellations, Pessac-Léognan, the Right Bank areas of Pomerol and St.-Emilion, and the sweet wine areas of Sauternes and Barsac

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Bordeauxmap.pdf

Bordeaux is the world’s premier wine capital! The Bordeaux region of France produces some of the world’s most famous wines including: St. Emilion, Margaux and Pauillac.

The wine regions of Bordeaux encompass a large number of wine growing areas of the Gironde department of Aquitaine.

The Bordeaux region is naturally divided by the Gironde Estuary into the Left Bank and the Right Bank. The Left Bank area includes the Médoc and Graves. The Right Bank area includes the Libournais, Bourg and Blaye.

“The Médoc is divided into Haut-Médoc (the upstream or southern portion) and Bas-Médoc (the downstream or northern portion, often referred to simply as “Médoc”).”

There are various sub-regions within the Haut-Médoc, including St-Estèphe, Pauillac, St.-Julien and Margaux. Graves includes the sub-regions of Pessac-Léognan and Sauternes. Sauternes includes the sub-region of Barsac.

The Libournais includes the sub-regions of Saint-Émilion and Pomerol. There is an additional wine region of Entre-Deux-Mers, so called because it lies between the Garonne and Dordogne rivers, which combine to form the Gironde.

All of these regions (except the Libournais) have their own appellation. They are “governed by Appellation d’origine contrôlée laws which dictate the permissible grape varieties, alcohol level, methods of pruning and picking, density of planting and appropriate yields as well as various winemaking techniques.”

Bordeaux wine labels will usually include the region on the front of the label.

The permissible grape varieties in red Bordeaux are: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot.

A general rule of thumb is that the Left Bank is predominately Cabernet Sauvignon based with the Right Bank being more Merlot based. The Graves area produces both red wine and white wine from the Sauvignon blanc, Sémillon and Muscadelle grapes.

“Saint-Émilion is an Appellation d’origine contrôlée (AOC) for wine in the Bordeaux wine region of France. It is situated in the Libourne subregion on the right bank of the Dordogne.”

Deutsch: Weinberg in der Côte de Nuits, Burgun...

Deutsch: Weinberg in der Côte de Nuits, Burgund, Frankreich English: Vineyard in Côte de Nuits, Burgundy, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Burgundy / Red Wine A look at key red-wine producing villages in the Côte de Nuits and Côte de Beaune

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Redburgmap.pdf

French wine region of the Cote de Nuits in Bur...

French wine region of the Cote de Nuits in Burgundy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vintages in the Côte de Beaune in Burgundy

Vintages in the Côte de Beaune in Burgundy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Burgundy / White Wine An overview of the appellations of Chablis, the Côte de Nuits, the Côte de Beaune, Côte Chalonnaise and the Mâconnais

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/BurgWhitemap.pdf

Champagne The heart of Champagne, including the districts of Côte des Blanc, Montagne de Reimans and Vallée de la Marne, plus key grand cru villages

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Champagnemap.pdf

Photo of a vineyard in the Loire Valley, France.

Photo of a vineyard in the Loire Valley, France. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Loire Valley A detailed look at the appellations along the Loire River, from Muscadet to Chinon and Vouvray to Sancerre and Pouilly-Fumé

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Loiremap.pdf

Côtes-du-rhône villages red 2007 Français : Cô...

Côtes-du-rhône villages red 2007 Français : Côtes-du-rhône villages rouge 2007 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Rhône Valley / Northern A detailed look at the appellations along the northern Rhône River, including Côte-Rôte, Condrieu, Château Grillet, St.-Joseph, Hermitage, Crozes-Hermitage, Cornas and Saint-Péray

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Rhonenorthmap.pdf

Rhône Valley / Southern A detailed look at appellations including Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Gigondas and Vacqueyras, as well as the Côtes du Rhône and named Côtes du Rhône-Villages

In the glass in partial view is the Hubert Lig...

In the glass in partial view is the Hubert Lignier Gevrey-Chambertin 2003. French wine from the Cote de Nuits region of Burgundy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Rhonesouthmap.pdf

Southern France An overview of the appellations in the Languedoc-Roussillon, Provence and southern Rhône regions

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/SoFrancemap.pdf

Thanks Wine Spectator–we love wine regions at www.vino-con-vista.com

Provence

Provence (Photo credit: bkcasteel)

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The Spring Chicago Artisan Chocolate Festival and Charity Wine Tasting 2017

Get tickets for the Spring Chicago Artisan Chocolate Festival and Charity Wine Tasting 2017

WHEN: April 22 & 23, 2017

Saturday 11am – 6pm
Sunday 11am – 5pm

Featuring the finest in Artisan Chocolate, Artisanal Foods and Wine, with demonstrations and more.
The Chicago Artisan Chocolate Festival supports 
BEAR NECESSITIES PEDIATRIC CANCER FOUNDATION.

Stephen M. Bailey Auditorium
in Plumbers Hall

1340 W. Washington Blvd., Chicago, IL 60607 (click for map)

In the West Loop’s historic Randolph Street Market District. Enter from Randolph Street or Washington Boulevard.

For Tickets visit:

http://www.fineartisanevents.com/choc/

Check out the vendors:

 

CHOCOLATIERS
Patricia’s Chocolate

Grand Haven, MI
_______


Sulpice Chocolat

Barrington, IL
_______

Sotiros Foods, Inc.

Alsip, IL
_______

Mayana Chocolate

Chicago, IL
_______

Let Them Eat Candles

Glencoe, IL
_______

Melt Chocolates

New Berlin, WI
_______

Amy’s Candy Bar

Chicago, IL
_______

Polli Wogs

Appleton, WI
_______

Birmingham Chocolate

Birmingham, MI
_______

Chutney Devis

Chicago, IL
_______

Grown Up Kid Stuff

Chicago, IL
_______

The Paleo Cookie Company

Chicago, IL
_______

The Mighty Truffle

Vashon Island, WA
_______

The Cocoa Cabana

West Dundee, IL
_______

Artisanne Chocolatier

Bay City, MI
_______

Sweet P’s Pantry

Oconomowoc, WI
_______

Tatewick Treats

Chicago, IL
_______

Kakao Chocolate

Clayton, MO
_______

Puna Chocolate

Hawaii
_______

Liveat Chocolate

Vancouver, WA
_______

Terry’s Toffee

Chicago, IL
_______

Barcacao Chocolat

Naperville, IL
_______

barkTHINS

Sonoma, CA
_______

Uptown Brownie

Chicago, IL
_______

ARTISANAL FOODS
Give Back Kitchen

Highland Park, IL
_______

Art of Tea

Los Angeles, CA
_______

OMG Olive Oils

Seattle, WA
_______

Alliance Patisserie
& Alliance BakeryChicago, IL
_______
Tea Gschwendner

Chicago, IL
_______

Gigi’s Cupcakes Chicago

Wilmette, IL
_______

Sparkling Ice

Preston, WA
_______

Lemaster Family Kitchen

Chicago, IL
_______

Spicemode

Chicago, IL
_______

Dip’n Good Dips

Rockford, IL
_______

Smitty Bee Honey

Defiance, IA
_______

Twisted Eggroll

Chicago, IL
_______

Cone Gourmet Ice Cream

Chicago, IL
_______

Glazed & Infused

Chicago, IL
_______

Krave Jerky

Sonoma, CA
_______

Umami Gourmet Coffee & Exotic Tea

Richmond, VA
_______

WINES & LIQUEURS
Boisset Wine Living

St. Helena, CA
_______

Deloach Vineyards

Santa Rosa, CA
_______

Raymond Vinyards

St. Helena, CA
_______

SOMRUS
Nectar of the GodsChicago, IL
_______
Wattle Creek

San Francisco, CA
_______

BuzzBallz

Carrollton, TX
_______

Mozart Chocolate Liqueur

Salzburg, Austria
_______

CHAMPAGNE METHOD SPARKLING
JCB Wines

St. Helena, CA
_______

Buena Vista Winery

Sonoma, CA
_______

 

SPONSORS

Bear Necessities
Pediatric Cancer Foundation
   
 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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Visit the Vino con Vista Champagne Region of France: Easter at The Cathedral of Notre Dame and the Coronation of the Kings in Reims

The baptism of Clovis Français : Le baptême de...

The baptism of Clovis Français : Le baptême de Clovis, scène dans la Sainte Chapelle de Paris (bien que l’évènement eut lieu dans la Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Reims) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Smiling Angel, Notre-Dame de Reims, France, c.1250

Smiling Angel, Notre-Dame de Reims, France, c.1250 (Photo credit: carulmare)

English: Paving stone in the nave of Notre Dam...

English: Paving stone in the nave of Notre Dame de Reims, France. Reads, in French: “Here Saint Remi (Saint Remigius) baptized Clovis king of the Franks” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Basilique Saint-Remi (Basilica St. Remigius), ...

Basilique Saint-Remi (Basilica St. Remigius), tombeau refait en 1847 avec les statues du XVIIème siècle, vue est et nord, Reims, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Baptism of Clovis I, in front of the ...

English: Baptism of Clovis I, in front of the Cathedral of Reims (1896). Français : Baptême de Clovis 1 er , roi des Francs, par St Rémi, représenté derrière la Basilique Saint Rémi à Reims (1896). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Coronation Robe of French Monarch

Coronation Robe of French Monarch (Photo credit: Andrew and Annemarie)

Paris - Latin Quarter: Panthéon - la vie de Je...

Paris – Latin Quarter: Panthéon – la vie de Jeanne d’Arc – sacre du roi Charles VII (Photo credit: wallyg)

Français : Palais du Tau, Reims, avec la Cathé...

Français : Palais du Tau, Reims, avec la Cathédrale sur le coté, vue depuis l’arrière du bâtiment (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Le Couronnement de la Vierge, détail du groupe...

Le Couronnement de la Vierge, détail du groupe ornant le gâble du portail central de la Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Reims.Il s’agit d’une copie de l’oeuvre originale, fortement dégradée et désormais exposée au Palais du Tau; cette copie a été réalisée par Georges Saupique en 1955. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France...

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France – Interior – Organ ไทย: มหาวิหารรีมส์, ประเทศฝรั่งเศส – ออร์แกน Français : Orgue de la cathédrale Note-Dame de Reims (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France...

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France – The Last Judgment Tympanum ไทย: มหาวิหารรีมส์, ประเทศฝรั่งเศส – การตัดสินครั้งสุดท้าย (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France...

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France – The Last Judgment Tympanum ไทย: มหาวิหารรีมส์, ประเทศฝรั่งเศส – การตัดสินครั้งสุดท้าย (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Notre-Dame de Reims

Notre-Dame de Reims (Photo credit: corsi photo)

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France...

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France – The Last Judgment Tympanum ไทย: มหาวิหารรีมส์, ประเทศฝรั่งเศส – การตัดสินครั้งสุดท้าย (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Cathedral of Notre-Dame, Reims, Champagne-Arde...

Cathedral of Notre-Dame, Reims, Champagne-Ardenne, France. 13th Century stained-glass windows above the choir, representing Our Lady, the Christ, the apostles, archbishops et bishops. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France...

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France – Tympanum ไทย: มหาวิหารรีมส์, ประเทศฝรั่งเศส – หน้าบัน เหนือประตู (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France...

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France – The Last Judgment Tympanum ไทย: มหาวิหารรีมส์, ประเทศฝรั่งเศส – การตัดสินครั้งสุดท้าย (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Calice du sacre,fin du XIIème siècle,Palais du...

Calice du sacre,fin du XIIème siècle,Palais du Tau,Trésor de la cathédrale de Reims. Or, émaux, perles, pierres fines et pierres précieuses. Il fut envoyé à la fonte à la Monnaie de Paris et heureusement oublié, puis exposé au Musée des Antiques de la Bibliothèque Nationale à Paris. Il fut renvoyé à Reims en 1861, sous Napoléon III. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Basilique Saint-Rémi — Reims, Champagne-Ardenn...

Basilique Saint-Rémi — Reims, Champagne-Ardenne, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Basilique Saint-Rémi — Reims, Champagne-Ardenn...

Basilique Saint-Rémi — Reims, Champagne-Ardenne, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Apse exterior of the Notre-Dame cathe...

English: Apse exterior of the Notre-Dame cathedral in Reims, France, from the Tau palace garden. Français : le jardin épiscopal, la salle du trésor du palais du Tau, le cœur et la flèche de la cathédrale (du premier plan à l’arrière plan). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There’s more to the Champagne region of France than hillsides cloaked with Pinot Noir  and Chardonnay vines. The Cathedral of Notre-Dame, the former Abbey of Saint-Remi and Palace of Tau in Reims are UNESCO sites in the spectacular Vino con Vista Champagne-Ardenne Region of France about 80 miles northeast of Paris.

The former archbishop’s palace known as the Tau Palace, because of its T-shaped layout, played an important role in religious ceremonies. It was almost entirely rebuilt in the 17th century.

The Palace was the residence of the Kings of France before their coronation in Notre-Dame de Reims. The King was dressed for the coronation at the palace before proceeding to the cathedral; afterwards, a banquet was held at the palace. The first recorded coronation banquet was held at the palace in 990, and the most recent in 1825.

Visit Reims Cathedral of Our Lady for Easter.

The Palace of Tau has been a museum since 1972 with remnants of the original cathedral statuary. The Musée de l’Œuvre also has reliquaries and tapestries from the cathedral. There are many interesting objects associated with the coronation of the French kings.

The Palace of Tau, the Cathedral of Notre-Dame and the former Abbey of Saint-Remi, became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1991.

The 6th century  Abbey of Saint-Remi has the relics of  the Saint who died in 553. St. Remi was the Bishop of Reims who converted Clovis, King of the Franks, to Christianity on Christmas Eve in 496  after he defeated the Alamanni in the Battle of Tolbiac. The basilica was consecrated by Pope Leo IX in 1049.

basilique saint Rémi - Reims

basilique saint Rémi – Reims (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The cathedral in Reims is an outstanding representation of 13th century Gothic art and architecture.

Founded by the Gauls, Reims became a major city during the period of the Roman Empire. The major routes from Rome to England and Rome to Germany joined at Chalons then diverged at Reims.

Reims also played a prominent ceremonial role in French monarchical history as the traditional site of the crowning of the kings of France. Archbishop St Remi instituted the Holy annointing of the Kings of France.  He was the Bishop of Reims and Apostle of the Franks. On December 24, 496, he baptized pagan Clovis I, King of the Franks. Clovis was converted by his wife Clothide. She was a Catholic Burgundian princess.

This baptism led to a seminal event in European history; the conversion of the Frankish people to Christianity. This alliance between Saint Remi and Clovis initiated a long history of the French Kingdom and the Catholic church.

reims 016

reims 016 (Photo credit: Walwyn)

In Reims, the Cathedral, the Archiepiscopal Palace, and the old Abbey of Saint-Rémi are directly linked to the history of the French monarchy because these places were part of the coronation ceremony. “For the Royal Anointing, which took place in the town’s cathedral, the Ampulla containing the Chrism, or holy oil, was brought from the Abbey of Saint-Rémi.” UNESCO

Ingres. Joan of Arc at the Coronation of Charl...

Ingres. Joan of Arc at the Coronation of Charles VII (Photo credit: paukrus)

The Monarchs of France ruled from the establishment of Francia in 486 to 1870. Three kings were crowned at the abbey of the church of Saint Remy and thirty at the Cathedral. From Louis VIII to Charles X, there were only two exceptions: Henry IV, crowned at Chartres and Louis XVIII.  These are the French dynasties and monarchies:

1. The Merovingian Dynasty ruled until 751

2. The Carolingian Dynasty until 987.

2. The Capetian Dynasty, the male-line descendants of Hugh Capet, ruled France continuously from 987 to 1792 and again from 1814 to 1848.

3. The branches of the dynasty which ruled after 1328, are generally given the specific branch names of Valois and Bourbon.

4. The House of Bonaparte and the Bourbon Restoration,  “Kings of the French” and “Emperors of the French” ruled in 19th century France, between 1814 and 1870.

Notre-Dame de Reims

Notre-Dame de Reims (Photo credit: ©HTO3)

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France...

English: Cathedral Notre-Dame de Reims, France – Gothic scultures decorating the North Portal. ไทย: มหาวิหารรีมส์, ประเทศฝรั่งเศส – ประติมากรรมกอธิคตกแต่งด้านหน้ามหาวิหาร (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Cathedral has a gallery of kings on the west front façade. On the north transcept, central portal on the left hand side you will see bishop Saint Nicaise holding his decapitated head in his hands. He was beheaded by the Barbarians on the square in front of his cathedral.

 

 

“The outstanding handling of new architectural techniques in the 13th century, and the harmonious marriage of sculptural decoration with architecture, has made Notre-Dame in Reims one of the masterpieces of Gothic art. The former abbey still has its beautiful 9th-century nave, in which lie the remains of Archbishop St Rémi (440–533), who instituted the Holy Anointing of the kings of France. The former archiepiscopal palace known as the Tau Palace, which played an important role in religious ceremonies, was almost entirely rebuilt in the 17th century.” UNESCO

Reims - Basilique Saint-Rémi | Explore

Reims – Basilique Saint-Rémi | Explore (Photo credit: Jean Lemoine)

Long Description

By virtue of the outstanding handling of new architectural techniques in the 13th century and the harmonious marriage of architecture and sculpted decoration, Notre-Dame Cathedral at Reims is a masterpiece of Gothic art. The perfection of the architecture and the sculptural ensemble of the cathedral were such that numerous later edifices were influenced by it, particularly in regions of Germany. The former abbey still has its beautiful 9th-century nave, in which lie the remains of Archbishop Saint Rémi (440-533). The former archiepiscopal palace known as the Tau Palace, which played an important role in religious ceremonies, was almost entirely rebuilt in the 17th century.

The cathedral, the Archiepiscopal Palace, and the old Abbey of Saint-Rémi are directly linked to the history of the French monarchy, and hence to that of France in general. These places were part of the coronation ceremony, the result of a perfect balance between Church and State that made the French monarchy a political model throughout Europe until modern times.

Lothaire (941-986,roi de France en 954).Statue...

Lothaire (941-986,roi de France en 954).Statue du XIIème siècle.Musée St Rémi à Reims. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Of great importance in the early days of Christianity in Gaul, Reims had a number of archbishops who were major figures in the Roman Catholic Church, canonized after their death. This was the case for the most famous among them, Rémi (440-533) the archbishop who baptized Clovis and instituted the Holy Anointing of Kings. The ceremony was fully established in the 12th century, and after that time almost all French sovereigns were consecrated at Reims. For the Royal Anointing, which took place in the town’s cathedral, the Ampulla containing the Chrism, or holy oil, was brought from the Abbey of Saint-Rémi. Rémi, who died in 533, was buried in St Christopher’s chapel, which was replaced in the 11th-12th centuries by a Benedictine abbey church.

The monastic buildings date from the 12th-13th centuries, but were extensively remodeled during the 17th century. However, some very interesting medieval parts were conserved. The present cathedral, built on the site of the Carolingian church which was destroyed by fire, is one of the great French cathedrals of the 13th century. Along with the cathedrals of Chartres and Amiens, it is at the summit of the classical Gothic style. At Reims all the innovations introduced at Chartres may be found, except that the builders of Reims, perhaps conscious of erecting the church for the coronation of the kings of France, enhanced the structural elements with greater lightness and made more openings in the walls to allow a maximum of light to filter through the stained glass and illuminate the sacred space. Nowhere is sculpture so prevalent on a Gothic facade than it is at Reims.

More than simple ornamentation, the sculpture of Reims Cathedral is an integral part of the architectural composition. Reflecting both Île-de-France traditions and the minor arts of the Champagne region, the sculpture possesses a monumental character and a grace inspired by the silver- or goldsmith’s art. While the smiling figures on the west facade are very famous, the sumptuousness of the composition of the Crowning of the Virgin (above the central portal) or the grave antique nobility of other figures such as Elizabeth in the composition depicting the Visitation should not be overlooked.

The old archiepiscopal palace was both the Episcopal See and an important step in the coronation ceremony, the banquet being held there. It was almost completely rebuilt by Robert de Cotte on the behest of Archbishop Le Tellier. The beautiful 18th-century Palatine chapel and the 15th-century banqueting hall were kept intact.” UNESCO

Basilique Saint-Rémi — Reims, Champagne-Ardenn...

Basilique Saint-Rémi — Reims, Champagne-Ardenne, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC

Basilique Saint-Rémi — Reims, Champagne-Ardenn...

Basilique Saint-Rémi — Reims, Champagne-Ardenne, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Filed under Italy Travel Guides, Visit the Vino con Vista Champagne Region of France: The Cathedral of Notre Dame and the Coronation of the Kings in Reims

Vino con Vista Vezelay France: The Way of Saint James and the Easter Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela to Spain

Saint James on the middle pier

Saint James on the middle pier (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Catedral de Santiago de Compostela

Catedral de Santiago de Compostela (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Way of St. James (el Camino de Santiago), ...

The Way of St. James (el Camino de Santiago), is the pilgrimage to the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela where legend has it that the remains of the apostle, Saint James the Great. The route was declared the first European Cultural Route by the Council of Europe in October 1987; it was also named one of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites in 1993. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Wayside cross in Laraño, Santiago de ...

English: Wayside cross in Laraño, Santiago de Compostela Galego: Cruceiro en Laraño, Santiago de Compostela (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

St. James's shell, a symbol of the route, on a...

St. James’s shell, a symbol of the route, on a wall in León, Spain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Reliquary with a supposed head of St....

Vezelay is a UNESCO World Heritage Site on the Route of Santiago de Compostela in France. Recently, I traveled to the picturesque Vino con Vista village of Vezelay France in the Yonne department in northern Burgundy where Bourgogne Vezelay is the local wine appellation.

“In the Middle Ages, the village of Vezelay was one of Europe’s most sacred places. In about 1050, local monks claimed they had acquired the miracle-working bones of St Mary Magdalene.

Vezelay

This town has a magnificent Basilica on the route called Santiago de Compostela with the remains of Saint Mary Magdalene. This pilgrimage has been done for centuries by pious pilgrims who converged there from all over Europe throughout the Middle Ages on their way to Santiago de Compostela, at the foot of the St. James the Apostle’s tomb in Spain.

Santiago’s city center is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Praza do Obridorio is a wide city plaza that contains the medieval Cathedral of St. James (also known as Santiago). The Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela is one of the most famous sites for religious pilgrimages in Spain. You can visit the Museo das Pergrinacions (Museum of Pilgrimage). In this town you should also consider a visit to the Museo do Pobo Galego (Museum of Galician People).

Saint James, the brother of St. John the Evangelist,  is the patron saint of Spain. His remains are in Santiago de Compostela in Galicia. His feast day is on July 25th. The traditional pilgrimage to the grave of the saint, known as the “Way of St. James“, has been the most popular pilgrimage for Western European Catholics since the Early Middle Ages.

English: Niederaltaich abbey church ( Lower Ba...

English: Niederaltaich abbey church ( Lower Bavaria ). Fresco at ceiling of the nave: Saint James the Less ( apostle ). Deutsch: Klosterkirche Niederaltaich ( Niederbayern ). Deckenfresco im Langhaus: Apostel Jakobus minor. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

He was the first Apostle to be martyred. It is believed that the completion of the pilgrimage will forgive all of your sins.

St. James pilgrim passport stamps in France on...

St. James pilgrim passport stamps in France on the Via Turenensis (Tours route) for the Chemin de St. Jacques de Compostelle. The World Heritage Sites of the Routes of Santiago de Compostela in France lists the major French towns with stamps. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pilgrimages were an essential part of western European spiritual and cultural life in the Middle Ages. The routes that they took were equipped with facilities for the spiritual and physical well-being of pilgrims. Watch this UNESCO video to better understand this pilgrimage: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/868/video This was the first officially recognized “European Cultural Route” in 1987: the Way of St. James route (The French Way) to Santiago de Compostela in Spain.

 

“The Route of St James of Compostela has preserved the most complete material record in the form of ecclesiastical and secular buildings, settlements both large and small, and civil engineering structures. This Route played a fundamental role in facilitating the two-way interchange of cultural developments between the Iberian Peninsula and the rest of Europe during the Middle Ages.” UNESCO

 

Although there are three basic Christian pilgrimage routes in Europe; the other two pilgrimage routes, to Jerusalem and Rome, are not organized in the same manner.

“In addition to its enormous historical and spiritual value, the route  represents a remarkable display of European artistic and architectural evolution over several centuries. The different pilgrimage routes that converged on Santiago de Compostela, are lined with works of art and architectural creations. The cultural heritage represents the birth of Romanesque art; Gothic cathedrals and  monasteries. The four main pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela in France began at Paris, Vézelay, Le Puy, and Arles respectively, and each of these was fed by a number of subsidiary routes. The French routes include: Regions of Aquitaine, Auvergne, Basse-Normandie, Bourgogne, Centre, Champagne-Ardenne, Ile-de-France, Languedoc-Roussillon, Limousin, Midi-Pyrénées, Picardie, Poitou-Charentes, and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur.

To reach Spain pilgrims had to pass through France, using specific routes with important historical monuments. Here’s a series of pictures of the pilgrimage stops along the routes: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/868/

Here’s the UNESCO inscription:

The Pilgrimage Route of Santiago de Compostela played a key role in religious and cultural exchange and development during the later Middle Ages, and this is admirably illustrated by the carefully selected monuments on the routes followed by pilgrims in France. The spiritual and physical needs of pilgrims travelling to Santiago de Compostela were met by the development of a number of specialized types of edifice, many of which originated or were further developed on the French sections.

After Jerusalem was captured by the Caliph Omar in 638, Christians were hesitant about going to the Holy City as pilgrims. Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, where the tomb of the apostle St James the Great, who brought Christianity to the Iberian peninsula, had been founded around 800, benefited from the decline of Jerusalem as a pilgrimage centre.

Santiago began as a local religious centre, becoming the See of a bishopric around 900, but its renown grew rapidly after the visit in 951 of Godescalc, Bishop of Le Puy and one of the first foreign pilgrims to be recorded. From the 11th century onwards, pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela reached its apogee. Thousands of pilgrims, among them kings and bishops, travelled long distances to pray at the tomb of one of Christ’s closest companions. This flowering coincided with that of the Cluniac Order, which encouraged the worship of relics by publishing Lives of the Saints and Collections of Miracles. From the 11th-13th centuries ‘staging post’ churches developed along the pilgrimage route, and in particular in France.

English: Cruise at Pelamios, Santiago de Compo...

English: Cruise at Pelamios, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia Galego: Cruceiro en Pelamios, Santiago de Compostela, Galiza (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The four main pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela in France began at Paris, Vézelay, Le Puy, and Arles respectively, and each of these was fed by a number of subsidiary routes. Thus, the start of the Paris route saw the convergence of routes from Boulogne, Tournai, and the Low Countries, while routes from Caen, Mont-Saint-Michel, and Brittany joined it at intermediate points such as Tours, Poitiers, Saint-Jean d’Angély and Bordeaux (the port for pilgrims coming by sea from England and coastal areas of Brittany and Normandy). Le Puy was the link with the Rhône valley, whereas those coming from Italy passed through Arles. The three western routes converged at Ostabat, crossing the Pyrenees by means of the Ibaneta pass, while the eastern route from Arles used the Somport pass; the two routes joined in Spain at Puente-la-Reina.

The places of worship along the pilgrimage routes in France range from great structures such as Saint-Sernin at Toulouse or Amiens Cathedral to parish churches. All are included either because they figure on the guide produced by Aymeric Picaud (Saint-Front Cathedral at Périgueux or the Church of Saint-Léonard de-Noblat) or because they contain important relics and other material that connect them directly with the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. Certain churches exhibit architectural characteristics that permit them to be given the appellation of ‘pilgrimage churches’. Sainte-Foy at Conques, Saint-Sernin at Toulouse, and the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela itself in particular have in common large transepts and apsidal chapels ranged round a spacious ambulatory, designed to meet the liturgical needs of pilgrims.

Pilgrimages in the Middle Ages imposed considerable hardships on the pilgrims, such that they were often in need of medical treatment and care. Few of these survive intact on the French sections of the route and are included in the World Heritage site. A number of bridges are known as ‘pilgrims’ bridges’, and that over the Borade at Saint-Chély-d’Aubrac even has the figure of a pilgrim carved on it. Of special importance are the Pont du Diable over the Hérault at Aniane, one of the oldest medieval bridges in France, and the magnificent 14th-century fortified Pont Valentré over the Lot at Cahors.

While the course of the different routes is generally known, very little of them survive in anything approaching their original form. The seven stretches included in the site are all on the Le Puy route, and cover a little over 20% of its total length. These are relatively minor roads whose course has not changed significantly since the Middle Ages; they are also lined with monuments associated with the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, such as crosses and modest places of worship.”

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC

The pilgrimage begins at Romanesque Vezelay Abbey. The Basilica of St. Mary Magdalene Basilique (Sainte-Marie-Madeleine) dominates the hilly Burgundy landscape.

 

Vézelay

Vézelay (Photo credit: gcorret)

Français : Statue de Bernard de Clairvaux, Mai...

Français : Statue de Bernard de Clairvaux, Maison natale de Saint Bernard de Clairvaux, Fontaine-lès-Dijon, Côte-d’Or, Bourgogne,FRANCE (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: louis VII of france

English: louis VII of france (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ascension of Mary Magdalene

Ascension of Mary Magdalene (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Map of the way of St James In Europe

Map of the way of St James In Europe (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mary Magdalene. Lime tree wood and polychromy,...

Mary Magdalene. Lime tree wood and polychromy, 16th century. Part of the feet were restored in the 19th century. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Statues of David and Solomon on the flight of ...

Statues of David and Solomon on the flight of steps leading to the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Spain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Santiago apostle. Palace of Raxoi, Sa...

English: Santiago apostle. Palace of Raxoi, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain) Galego: Apóstolo Santiago, Pazo de Raxoi, Santiago, Galicia (Spain) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bourgogne - Vezelay - Basilique Sainte-Madelei...

Bourgogne – Vezelay – Basilique Sainte-Madeleine – Façade avant (Photo credit: Francis Fantoni)

Santiago de Compostela Cathedral, Galicia, A C...

Santiago de Compostela Cathedral, Galicia, A Coruña, Spain which houses the tomb of St. James son of Zebedee. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

Henry became a Cistercian under the influence ...

Henry became a Cistercian under the influence of Bernard of Clairvaux, shown here in a 13th century illuminated manuscript. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Walk in the footsteps of the pilgrims and the Crusaders at the Vezelay Abbey.  It has a long history of links to the Crusades.

The church was dedicated on April 21, 1104. It became such a popular pilgrimage site that Pope Innocent II extended the narthex to accomodate them in 1132.

Crusaders gathered around Saint Bernard of Clairvaux when he preached for a 2nd Crusade on Easter 1146, in the presence of King Louis VII. Saint Bernard was canonized by Pope Alexander III on January 18, 1174.

 In 1190, Richard I of England (Richard the Lion-Hearted) and Phillip II of France spent three months here before leaving for the 3rd Crusade. The church was sacked by the Huguenots in 1569 and severely damaged during the French Revolution.
 
Vezelay France

Vezelay France

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The church became a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1979. In 1987, the European Union declared the Camino de Santiago to be the first European Cultural Itinerary.

English: Saint Bernard of Clairvaux - Sint Ber...

English: Saint Bernard of Clairvaux – Sint Bernardusstraat, Maastricht, The Netherlands. By Jean Sondeijker, 1946. Nederlands: Sint Bernardus van Clairvaux – Sint Bernardusstraat, Maastricht. Door Jean Sondeijker, 1946. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 
 
 
 
Vézelay’s hilltop location made it an obvious site for a town since ancient times. In the 9th century the Benedictines were given land to build a monastery. According to legend, not long before the end of the first millennium, a monk named Baudillon brought relics (bones) of Mary Magdalene to Vézelay from Saint-Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume

 

 

 

 

When you climb the hill to the Basilica you will notice the shells on the street. Climb the crest to the summit of the hill climbed by  millions of pilgrims as they make their way to Compostella Spain to venerate the remains of St. James, the Apostle. For more than a thousand years, pilgrims have walked the Camino de Santiago (Way of St. James), “seeking penance, enlightenment, and adventure.” Santiago de Compostela was proclaimed the first European Cultural itinerary by the Council of Europe in 1987. There are about 1,800 historic buildings along the route.

The shells on the street indicate that this is the Way of Saint James; the Camino de Santiago. Four major routes through France lead to the Spanish Cathedral in Galicia including: Paris through Tours (Via Turonensis), Vézelay (Via Lemovicensis) and Le Puy-en-Velay.

When I climbed the steep slope to the magnificent church, I saw many pilgrims on their way into

Abbatiale de Vézelay, Bourgogne, France : nart...

Abbatiale de Vézelay, Bourgogne, France : narthex, tympan de droite (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

the Basilica. When I entered the church, they had congregated in the narthex under the central tympanum and began praying. The tympanum depicts a benevolent Christ with arms wide open, flanked on both sides by his Apostles conveying his message to them. He is sending the Crusaders out; they were guaranteed remission of their sins if they participated in the Crusades.

 

I followed the pilgrims  into the church where they walked over to the staircase next to the statue of Saint Mary Magdelene. When they walked down the stairs, they arrived at her shrine with her relics. They began praying and singing. Although I have been to Lourdes and Fatima, I can honestly say that this was one of the most moving spiritual displays of faith that I have ever witnessed.

 

France, Abbey of la Madaleine Vezelay, 12th ce...

France, Abbey of la Madaleine Vezelay, 12th century tympanum, Romanesque sculpture. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Saint Mary Magdalene was recognized by early church fathers as “the apostle to the apostles”. According to the Gospel, she “stood in the presence of the risen Jesus and went to tell the other disciples the news of the Resurrection”.

Shortly after its foundation in the 9th century, the Cluniac Benedictine abbey of Vezelay acquired the relics of St. Mary Magdalene and has been an important pilgrimage ever since. Her relics were transfered from her sepulchre in the Dominican oratory of Saint Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume at Aix en Provence to protect them from the Saracens. In 1058, Pope Stephen IX, confirmed the authenticity of the relics, leading to an influx of pilgrims that has continued to this day.

 

¨raza das Praterias; cathedral of Santiago de ...

¨raza das Praterias; cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Spain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNESCO:

“The tradition whereby the Apostle St James the Great preached the Gospel in Spain dates from the early 7th century. In the Latin Breviary of the Apostles, St Jerome held that apostles were buried where they preached, and so it was assumed that the body of St James had been moved from Jerusalem, where according to the Acts of the Apostles he was martyred on the order of Herod Agrippa, to a final resting place in Spain. It was not until the 9th century that the apostle’s tomb was identified at Compostela. The late 8th century saw the consolidation of the Christian kingdom of Galicia and Asturias in northern Spain, with the support of Charlemagne. It was to provide the base for the reconquest of the peninsula from Muslim domination, a process that was not to be completed until 1492. The apostle had been adopted as its patron saint by the Christian kingdom. In the early years of the 9th century, during the reign of Alfonso II, his tomb was ‘discovered’ in a small shrine by the hermit Pelayo and Todemiro, bishop of the most westerly diocese in the kingdom.”

“There are two access routes into Spain from France, entering at Roncesvalles (Valcarlos Pass) and Canfranc (Somport Pass) respectively; they merge west of Pamplona, just before Puente la Reina. It passes through 166 towns and villages, and it includes over 1,800 buildings of historic interest; in many cases the modern road runs parallel to the ancient route. The tradition of pilgrimage to Santiago has not ceased since that time, although its popularity waned in recent centuries. Since it was declared to be the first European Cultural Itinerary by the Council of Europe in 1987, however, it has resumed the spiritual role that it played in the Middle Ages, and every year sees many thousands of pilgrims following it on foot or bicycle.” UNESCO

 

Source: UNESCO/CLT/WHC

 

UNESCO Historical Description

“The tradition whereby the apostle St James the Great preached the gospel in Spain dates from the early 7th century, in the Latin Breviary of the Apostles. St Jerome held that apostles were buried where they preached, and so it was assumed that the body of St James had been moved from Jerusalem, where according to the Acts of the Apostles, he was martyred on the order of Herod Agrippa, to a final resting place in Spain.

It was not until the 9th century that the apostle’s tomb was identified at Compostela. The late 8th century saw the consolidation of the Christian kingdom of Galicia and Asturias in northern Spain, with the support of Charlemagne. It was to provide the base for the reconquest of the peninsula from Muslim domination, a process that was not to be completed until 1492. The apostle had been adopted as its patron saint by the Christian kingdom, and in the early years of the 9th century, during the reign of Alfonso II, his tomb was “discovered” in a small shrine by the hermit Pelayo and Todemiro, Bishop of the most westerly diocese in the kingdom.

The fame of the tomb of St James, protector of Christendom, quickly spread across western Europe and it became a place of pilgrimage, comparable with Jerusalem and Rome. By the beginning of the 10th century pilgrims were coming to Spain on the French routes from Tours, Limoges, and Le Puy, and facilities for their bodily and spiritual welfare began to be endowed along what gradually became recognized as the formal pilgrimage route, whilst in Compostela itself a magnificent new basilica was built to house the relics of the apostle, along with other installations – churches, chapels, hospices, and hospitals. The 12th century saw the Route achieve its greatest influence, used by thousands of pilgrims from all over Western Europe. In 1139 the first “guidebook” to the Route appeared, in the form of Book V of the Calixtine Codex (attributed to Pope Calixtus II but most probably the work of the pilgrim Ayrneric Picaud), describing its precise alignment from Roncesvalles to Santiago de Compostela and listing the facilities available to pilgrims. These structures, ranging from humble chapels and hospices to magnificent cathedrals, represent every aspect of artistic and architectural evolution from Romanesque to Baroque and beyond, demonstrating the intimate linkages between faith and culture in the Middle Ages. The establishment of the pilgrimage route inevitably led to its adoption as a commercial route, resulting in economic prosperity for several of the towns along its length.

The tradition of pilgrimage to Santiago has not ceased since that time, though its popularity waned in recent centuries. Since it was declared to be the first European Cultural Itinerary by the Council of Europe in 1987, however, it has resumed the spiritual role that it played in the Middle Ages, and every year sees many thousands of pilgrims following it on foot or bicycle.”

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Tympan (externe) de l'abbatiale de Vézelay

Tympan (externe) de l’abbatiale de Vézelay (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

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The Easter Story: Paschal Triduum of Death, Burial and Resurrection

Mosaic (Jesus) from Hagia Sophia

Mosaic (Jesus) from Hagia Sophia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Português: Mosaico do Portão Imperial em Hagia...

Português: Mosaico do Portão Imperial em Hagia Sophia. Ajoelhado à direita do Cristo Pantocrator está o imperador bizantino Leão VI. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A 14th-century of Jesus Christ bearin...

English: A 14th-century of Jesus Christ bearing the cross, from the monastery in . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Beginning of 11th century

Beginning of 11th century (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bishop John washes the feet of Eleanor, who wa...

Bishop John washes the feet of Eleanor, who walks to St. Giles, Wrexham, in bare feet, on Maundy Thursday 2007. Photograph by Brian Roberts, Wrexham (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Christ washing the feet of the Apostl...

English: Christ washing the feet of the Apostles. Icon of Pskov school. Русский: Омовение ног (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Christ icon in Taizé

Christ icon in Taizé (Photo credit: lgambett)

Français : Christ en Croix d'Agnolo Allori, di...

Français : Christ en Croix d’Agnolo Allori, dit Bronzino, vers 1545, huile sur panneau, 145 x 115 cm, Musée des beaux-arts de Nice, France. Italiano: Cristo in croce di Agnolo Allori, detto Bronzino, circa 1545, olio su legno, 145 x 115 cm, Museo di belle-arti di Nizza, Francia. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Jesus Christ - detail from Deesis mos...

English: Jesus Christ – detail from Deesis mosaic, Hagia Sophia, Istanbul (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The three days before Easter are called the Paschal Triduum of Death, Burial and Resurrection of the Lord http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcNFTNu1I4M.

This is a three day liturgical celebration. The liturgy held on the evening of Maundy Thursday initiates the Easter Triduum. This period includes Good Friday, Holy Saturday and ends Easter.

The Easter Vigil is the high point of the Triduum: “The night Jesus Christ broke the chains of death and rose triumphant from the grave.”  The church empties the Holy Water from the fonts on the days of the Sacred Paschal Triduum in preparation of the blessing of the water at the Easter Vigil. The Passion is read three times during Holy Week: Passion Sunday, Holy Thursday and Good Friday. The words of Jesus are always read by a priest.

The Holy Seapulchre Church, Jerusalem. Catholi...

The Holy Seapulchre Church, Jerusalem. Catholic Holy Mass on Maundy Thursday / Crkva Svetoga groba u Jeruzalemu. Katolička sveta misa na Veliki četvrtak. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Icon of Jesus Christ

English: Icon of Jesus Christ (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On Holy Thursday (Maundy Thursday), the Pope performs a rare morning mass. “The Mass of the Chrism” is held in St. Peter’s Square when the oils are blessed and the Chrism is consecrated.  Chrism is a combination of balsam and oil and is used for annointing for occasions like confirmation and ordinations.

In the evening after sun-down, the Mass of the Lord’s Supper commemorates the institution of the Eucharist and the Last Supper of Jesus with the Apostles. This event includes a reading of Matthew’s account of the “Passion of Christ“; the narration of Jesus’ capture, suffering and death. It includes the representation of Jesus Christ washing the feet of his Disciples which was carried out by Pope Benedict at the Cathedral of St. John Lateran where he washed the feet of 12 priests http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngIUmGhwwqs.

Deposition of Christ, 1507, drawing from Roman...

Deposition of Christ, 1507, drawing from Roman sarcophagi. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On Good Friday, the day of Christ’s brutal crucufixion in AD 33, choirs sing St. John’s version of Christ’s crucifixion. Peter Paul Rubens’ “Ecce Homo” (Behold the Man) portrays Christ with his “Crown of Thorns” before his Crucifixion. After his crucifixion, he was covered with a shroud http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dVQnkKlphY&feature=relmfu.

English: Mosaic in baptistery of San Marco - &...

English: Mosaic in baptistery of San Marco – “Crucifixion of Jesus Christ” Русский: Мозаика баптистерия базилики Сан Марко – “Распятие Христово” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On this day in Catholic churches around the world, Christians glorify the cross in their individual parishes http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubkiKyjo9WU. The cross is venerated as a symbol of our faith by kneeling in front of the cross and kissing it. In this way, we honor the Lord’s Cross as an instrument of our salvation. The cross was the means of Jesus Christ’s execution and as a sign of victory over sin and death. The church does not celebrate the Liturgy of the Eucharist on Good Friday, rather the Church commemorates the Lord’s Passion.

Jesus helped by Simon of Cyrene, part of a ser...

Jesus helped by Simon of Cyrene, part of a series depicting the stations of the Cross. Chapel Nosso Senhor dos Passos, Santa Casa de Misericórdia of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Oil on canvas, XIXth century, unknown author. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In Rome on Good Friday, a solemn “Via Crucis Procession” (The Way of the Cross) involves an evening torch-lit procession that follows the Pope as he traces the Stations of the Cross from the Colosseum to Palatine Hill http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2qwjLTFcwQ. The church in Rome adopted the practice of “Adoration of the Cross” from the Church in Jerusalem where a fragment of wood believed to be the Lord’s cross has been venerated every year on Good Friday since the fouth century http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8eDPyXYv50.

St. Helen, the mother of emperor Constantine, discovered this fragment of wood on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 326. Pope Alexander VII had the top of the obelisk in St. Peter’s Square adorned with his insignia. There is a relic of Christ’s “True Cross” encased in this emblem of Pope Alexander that crowns the Obelisk.

Jesus had 12 disciples. They were pupils or followers of Christ. The Passion of Christ was initiated when the Temple Guards, guided by Judas Iscario, captured Jesus. Judas was a Disciple of Jesus who betrayed him by telling the guards that whomever he kisses, they should arrest. Judas was paid in silver for his betrayal which is portrayed  in “The Kiss of Judas.” The trial and painful crucifixion of Jesus ensued. Judas ended up returning the silver and committing suicide.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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Baconfest Chicago 2017: It Always Sells Out!

Baconfest 2.0

Baconfest 2.0 (Photo credit: Gamma Man)

Baconfest 2.0

Baconfest 2.0 (Photo credit: Gamma Man)

Baconfest 2.0

Baconfest 2.0 (Photo credit: Gamma Man)

Get your tickets for Baconfest Chicago 2017. It always sells out way in advance!

BaconFest is a tasting event featuring bacon dishes from the best chefs in the country.

Baconfest Chicago 2017 will be on Friday March 31 and Saturday April 1, 2017 at the UIC Forum (725 W. Roosevelt)!

Friday Dinner – March 31
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM VIP Hour
7:00 PM -10:00 PM General Admission Period

Saturday Lunch – April 1
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM VIP hour
12:00 PM – 3:00 PM General Admission Period

Saturday Dinner – April 1
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM VIP Hour
7:00 PM -10:00 PM General Admission Period

Tickets

Tickets to Baconfest Chicago 2017 will go on sale Wednesday December 7 at 12:00 PM Central Time at this link.

aconfest?

2017 Restaurant Roster

Want to be included? Email andre@baconfestchicago.com
Roster subject to change without notice.

FRIDAY DINNER 3/31

Cooking Channel VIP Hour – 6:00pm-7:00pm
General Admission – 7:00pm-10:00pm
Express General Admission – 7:30pm- 10:00pm 



SATURDAY LUNCH 4/1
Presented by Jewel-Osco
Cooking Channel VIP Hour – 11:00am-12:00pm
General Admission – 12:00pm-3:00pm
Express General Admission – 12:30pm- 3:00pm



SATURDAY DINNER 4/1

Cooking Channel VIP Hour – 6:00pm-7:00pm
General Admission – 7:00pm-10:00pm
Express General Admission – 7:30pm- 10:00pm



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