Category Archives: Italy Travel Guides

Daniel Burnham’s Vision for Chicago: Paris on the Prairie

White City of the World's Columbian Exposition...

White City of the World’s Columbian Exposition (1893) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Administration Building, seen from the Agr...

The Administration Building, seen from the Agricultural Building. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Horticultural Building, with Illinois Building...

Horticultural Building, with Illinois Building in the background. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: The Republic in Jackson Park, Chicago...

English: The Republic in Jackson Park, Chicago, IL, USA (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Daniel Burnham on the terrace of his Evanston,...

Daniel Burnham on the terrace of his Evanston, IL home. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Source: http://www.chicagob2b.net/lin...

English: Source: http://www.chicagob2b.net/links/pages/CitySeal1.gif This image is a copy of the official seal of the City of Chicago, Illinois, as designed and adopted by the City in 1905. As such, it is a work authored before 1922, and is therefore in the public domain. A 1895 edition of the seal can be seen here. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: View of Millennium Park from the Will...

English: View of Millennium Park from the Willis Tower (Formerly Sears Tower) in 2007, before Legacy Tower was built. The Jay Pritzker Pavilion and BP Bridge in the park are clearly visible, as well as part of Lurie Garden at right and the McDonald Cycle Center in the left hand corner. Daley Bicentennial Plaza is behind Millennium Park, both are part of the larger Grant Park. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Millennium Park, Chicago, IL, USA from Aon Cen...

Millennium Park, Chicago, IL, USA from Aon Center (Chicago) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: View of Chicago, United States from t...

English: View of Chicago, United States from the 340 on the Park skyscraper. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Daniel Hudson Burnham (1846-1912) was a leading architect and forward thinking urban-planner. He wanted Chicago to become Paris on the Prairie.

 

Burnham and Root were the architects of one of the first American skyscrapers: the Masonic Temple Building in Chicago. It was Measuring 21 stories high at 302 feet. It was torn down in 1939.

Burnham and Root played an integral role in why Chicago looks the way it does today. They accepted the responsibility of overseeing and constructing the Exposition of 1893  to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ famous voyage.

After Root’s sudden death, the plans were radically changed into a Classical Revival style in Jackson Park on the south lake font in Chicago.

Burnham became the Director of Works, and ultimately led the design and construction of  the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition.

Considered the first example of  comprehensive planning  in the nation, the fairground was complete with grand boulevards, classical building facades, and lush gardens. Often called the “White City”, it “popularized neoclassical architecture in a monumental and rational Beaux-Arts plan.” Much of his work was based on the classical style from Rome and Greece.

In 1909 he declared “The Lakefront belongs to the People” and laid out the Burnham plan; his vision for Grant Park that still guides the Park’s evolution.

Initiated in 1906 and published in 1909, Burnham and his co-author Edward H. Bennett prepared “The Plan of Chicago“, which laid out plans for the future of the city. The plan included ambitious proposals for the lakefront and river and declared that every citizen should be within walking distance of a park.

Many plans and conceptual designs of the south lakefront from the Columbian Exposition came in handy. He envisioned Chicago as a “Paris on the Prairie”. French-inspired public works projects, fountains, and boulevards radiating from a central domed municipal building became Chicago’s new backdrop. Burnham is famously quoted as saying, “Make no little plans. They have no magic to stir men’s blood and probably will not themselves be realized.” This slogan has been taken to capture the essence of Burnham’s spirit.

Chicago Loop 2015 Statues 063Chicago Loop 2015 Statues 042

 

You can walk “The View Path” that highlights his plan in a new exhibit at Millennium Park. If you want to stay at a nice hotel in Chicago that was designed by Burnham and Root, head over to The Reliance Building  at 1 W. Washington Street in the Loop. The first floor and basement were designed by John Root of the Burnham and Root architectural firm in 1890, with the rest of the building completed by Charles B. Atwood in 1895. It is the first skyscraper to have large plate glass windows make up the majority of its surface area. The Reliance Building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970; and on January 7, 1976, it was designated a National Historic Landmark.  Stay at the lovely the 122-room Hotel Burnham and dine at the Atwood Cafe.

Chicago Loop 2015 Statues 070

 

Chicago Loop 2015 Statues 048 Chicago Loop 2015 Statues 049 Chicago Loop 2015 Statues 050 Chicago Loop 2015 Statues 051 Chicago Loop 2015 Statues 052

The path includes following sites:

Cloudgate

Lurie Garden

Nichols Bridge

Art Institute of Chicago

South Garden

Railway Exchange

Congress Plaza

Congress Parkway Bridge

North President’s Court

Lincoln Statue

Buckingham Fountain

Outdoor Rooms

Lower Hutchinson Field

Lake Michigan Shoreline

Museum Campus

“Burnham View” a new permanent landmark sculpture with a spectacular view of the city and the park

Chicago Loop 2015 Statues 069

 

The Burning of the White City. (Electricity Bu...

The Burning of the White City. (Electricity Building on left, Mines and Mining Building on right.) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Burnham also designed several notable buildings and skyscrapers in Chicago including:

 

 

 He died in Heidelberg, Germany and the successor firm to Burnham’s practice was Graham, Anderson, Probst & White, which continued in some form until 2006. There is a tribute to Burnham in Burnham Park and Daniel Burnham Court in Chicago.
Chicago Loop 2015 Statues 082
Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

 

Cloud Gate from east with East Randolph Street...

Cloud Gate from east with East Randolph Street skyscrapers in background. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

English: Buckingham Fountain in the foreground...

English: Buckingham Fountain in the foreground with one of the Prudential Buildings at the far left and the AON Center (the tallest building) in the background. The top of the John Hancock Center is also visible (the one with two antennae at the top). I took this photo 11 Jul 2005. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A view toward the Peristyle from Machinery Hall.

A view toward the Peristyle from Machinery Hall. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Manufactures and Liberal Arts Building, se...

The Manufactures and Liberal Arts Building, seen from the southwest. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Midway Plaisance, Chicago.

Midway Plaisance, Chicago. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Portrait of John Wellborn Root

Portrait of John Wellborn Root (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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The Amazing Pont d’Avignon on the Rhone River in France

The bridge over the River Rhône at Avignon (ph...

The bridge over the River Rhône at Avignon (photograph taken from the island of Barthelasse) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The St. Benezet Bridge  is also known as the Pont d’Avignon. This famous 12th century bridge is located in Avignon France. The bridge originally spanned 2,950 feet across the Rhône River. The bridge is historically significant because in was an important strategic river crossing. The bridge collapsed frequently and was reconstructed multiple times. Today, only 4 of the original 22 arches remain.

According to legend, the history of the St. Benezet Bridge centers around a local shepherd boy of the same name who was told by an angel to construct the bridge. He proved his divine inspiration to the town and wealthy benefactors by lifting a large stone block. The bridge also served as a place of worship for Rhône boatmen until it became so unsteady it was deemed dangerous.

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UNESCO Wine Regions in Vino con Vista Piedmont Italy

English: Fountain at Agliè castle (The castle ...

English: Fountain at Agliè castle (The castle in one of the residences of the Royal House of Savoy), Agliè, Turin, Italy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Piedmont is one of Italy’s finest wine regions. In northwestern Piedmont, Nebbiolo grapes thrive and ultimately become Barolo and Barbaresco wine. “Rare vintages of Barolos (1985 or 1990) become favorites of serious wine enthusiasts with an extraordinary aging capacity. Click on this link to view Wine Spectator’s Piedmont wine map:

http://assets.winespectator.com/wso/Maps/Piedmontmap.pdf

This region’s terroir is also perfect for Barbera, Dolcetto, Brachetto and Grignolino.

The Castle of Agliè is one of the residences o...

The Castle of Agliè is one of the residences of the Royal House of Savoy. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are many interesting sites in this region of Italy. In the middle of the 16th century, the Savoy dynasty built a number of castles, villas and hunting lodges in and around Turin creating a UNESCO World Heritage complex.

In the hilly areas of the Langhe, Monferrato and the foothills many monastic complexes were built. The Sanctuary of San Michele is a Benedictine monastery founded in the 10th century on the summit of Mount Pirchiriano.

Piedmont is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Italy

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/media-services/multimedia/photos/photos-for-the-new-inscriptions-2014/italy/

 

Reggia di Venaria Reale, Torino - interni cate...

Reggia di Venaria Reale, Torino – interni category:user:Twice25 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Turin is the largest city in the hilly region of Piedmont. It was historically under Austro-Hungarian domination www.turismotorino.org.  The  amazing residences of the Royal House of Savoy include the Palazzo Reale, the Royal Armory, the Library and Stables.

Filippo Lippi

Filippo Lippi (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fra Filippo Lippi - IMGP6044

Fra Filippo Lippi – IMGP6044 (Photo credit: indianadinos)

Fra Filippo Lippi - Sts Gregory and Jerome - W...

Fra Filippo Lippi – Sts Gregory and Jerome – WGA13179 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Castello di Rivoli (Torino)

Castello di Rivoli (Torino) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Royal house of Savoy Coat of Arms, flags of th...

Royal house of Savoy Coat of Arms, flags of the Kingdom of Sardinia and the Collar of the Order of the Most Holy Annunciation Italiano: Stemma della casa reale di Savoia, bandiere del Regno di Sardegna e collare dell’Ordine supremo della Santissima Annunziata. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fra Filippo Lippi - The Doctors of the Church ...

Fra Filippo Lippi – The Doctors of the Church – WGA13177 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Visit the Pinocoteca dell’Accademia Albertina and the Galleria Sabauda for Renaissance art. Bellini, Fra Angelico and Fra Filippo Lippi masterpieces can be found in these galleries.

Fra Filippo Lippi - Sts Gregory and Jerome (de...

Fra Filippo Lippi – Sts Gregory and Jerome (detail) – WGA13182 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The original Holy Shroud (Sacra Sindone) of Turin is kept in Turin’s Duomo in a silver casket inside a marble coffer. The replica is available for viewing. Carbon testing in the late 1980’s indicated that the shroud dates back to the 12th century; so it apparently was not wrapped around Christ after his crucifixion. Visit the  museum of the Holy Shroud  on Via San Domenico.

Travel to Castello del Poggio.  Admire the 390 acres of vineyards dominated by the medieval fortification that belonged to the nobele Buneis family that once gaurded the city of Asti. You can see a vast amphitheater called the Val del Temp that was owned by the Templars in the 12th century. I love their fruity Barbera DiAsti DOC. Guided visits and tastings are by appointment only. www.poggio.it

Here are some of the Annual Festivals in Piemonte:

ASTI Douja D’Or; prestigious producers participate in the parade and celebration the second Saturday and Sunday in September.

The Palio of Asti is Italy’s most ancicent horse race with a historic procession and over 1000 people dressed in medieval attire in September.

lesser coat of arms of the Kingdom of Italy (1...

lesser coat of arms of the Kingdom of Italy (1890), instituted by Royal Decree n. 7282, 3rd series, 27 November 1890. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Alba Palio degli Asini is the Race of the Donkeys is on the first Sunday of October.

The Alba Truffle Festival is also in October.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Italy Travel Books at www.vino-con-vista.com

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Incredible Vino con Vista UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Southeastern Baroque Sicily

Modica

Modica (Photo credit: Francesco Di Martino)

Modica By Night

Modica By Night (Photo credit: Landersz)

Modica, Sizilien, Chiesa S.

Image via Wikipedia

Church of San Giorgio, Ragusa. Designed in 173...

Church of San Giorgio, Ragusa. Designed in 1738 by Rosario Gagliardi, it is approached by huge staircase of some 250 steps (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Illustration 3: A Sicilian belfry crowns Rosar...

Illustration 3: A Sicilian belfry crowns Rosario Gagliardi’s Church of San Giuseppe in Ragusa Ibla (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Modica

Modica (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Chiesa di San Domenico - Noto

Chiesa di San Domenico – Noto (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Coat of arms of Modica

Coat of arms of Modica (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Castle of the Counts of Modica.

The Castle of the Counts of Modica. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Cathedral of San Giorgio in Ragusa Ibla.

English: Cathedral of San Giorgio in Ragusa Ibla. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

St. John Church in (Sicily), built already in ...

St. John Church in (Sicily), built already in the 12th century, but rebuilt in the Baroque style in the 18th century. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Illustration 10: The Cathedral of San Giorgio,...

Illustration 10: The Cathedral of San Giorgio, Modica. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Witness  the dramatic landscape, the enchanting wine regions and the historical UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the late Baroque towns of the Val di Noto in Southeastern Sicily.  Southeastern Sicily is a “buon appetito” and Vino con Vista paradise. Culinary arts are truly appreciated in this region. They have mastered the art of merging a cultural kaleidoscope into delightful multi-cultural gourmet cuisine.

A baroque church in Modica

A baroque church in Modica (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are eight towns in southeastern Sicily that were all rebuilt after the earthquake of 1693: Caltagirone, Militello Val di Catania, Catania, Modica, Noto, Palazzolo, Ragusa and Scicli.  They are considered the “Pearls of Sicily” and are characterized by buildings with splendid facades and interiors. The devastating earthquake gave the architects a blank slate, so they selected the opulent Baroque style and built the structures using a local white limestone.  These UNESCO jewels are filled with gorgeous Baroque architecture. The buildings and churches are covered with ornate limestone that has a soft honey-colored patina from the sun.

1. Noto is the administrative center of the Noto Valley.  On the eastern side of Noto the Porta Reale (Royal Gate) was erected in 1838 for King Ferdinand II.  It offers a grand entrance to Piazza Municipio and Corso Vittorio Emanuel, Noto’s main streets. Visit the Church and Convent of San Francesco and the Church of San Carlo al Corso. The Church of San Domenico and the Palazzo Villadorta are also worthwhile.  Noto Antica was particularly significant during Arab domination.  Under Arab rule, Sicily was divided into three districts and Noto was a key player. The Sicilian Baroque Cathedral of San Nicolo is in the Piazza XVI Maggio. The cathedral recently received a new cupola.

2. Ragusa was built on two levels and is divided into two parts:  Modern and Ibla. Ragusa Ibla is cloaked with interesting medieval history.   In Ibla visit the Palazzo Bertini on Corso Italia 35.  It was built by the Floridia family in the 1700s.  The building is characterized by three interesting carved masks located in the keystones of the windows that represent three powers. These faces convey an interesting story about Sicily.  Visit the Palazzo Donnafugata.  The Palazzo houses an art gallery with canvases by Hans Memling, Ribera and Antonello Messina. In Ragusa the elaborate churches include Chiesa Giovanni Batista and the Cheisa de San Domenico with the majolica bell tower.  The Cathedral was named after St. John the Baptist and was built on top of the church of Saint Nicholas after the earthquake of 1693.

3. Modica is divided into two areas:  Modica Alta (upper Modica) and Modica Bassa (lower Modica).  Two noteworthy monuments are Saint George’s Cathedral in Modica Alta and Saint Peter’s Cathedral in Modica Bassa. Saint George’s Cathedral was built around 1350. It was partially destroyed by the earthquake of 1613 and completely demolished by the devastating earthquake of 1693.  It was reconstructed at the start of the 18th century by Mario Spada from Ragusa and Rosario Boscarino from Modica in the Late Baroque style. The statues of the Apostles line the entrance to the church on Corso Umberto, the town’s main artery.

To enter Upper Modica (Alta) take Via Garibaldi from Saint Peter’s Church. Walk about 250 steps to the Church of Saint George with a panoramic view of Lower Modica. The rose-colored limestone church has twelve columns and five naves with a central dome and two lateral domes. In the church, admire the inlaid silver holy chest in front of the altar. It was made in Venice in the 14th century and donated to the church by the Chiaramonte earls.

To learn more about Sicily read www.vino-con-vista.com Travel Guides and

Vino Con Vista Travel Guides can be purchased at these sites

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Chateaux de la Loire in France: Spectacular UNESCO Castles in the Loire Valley

“The Loire Valley is an outstanding cultural landscape of great beauty, containing historic towns and villages, great architectural monuments (the châteaux), and cultivated lands formed by many centuries of interaction between their population and the physical environment, primarily the river Loire itself.” UNESCO

UNESCO Justification for Inscription

“Criterion (i): The Loire Valley is noteworthy for the quality of its architectural heritage, in its historic towns such as Blois, Chinon, Orléans, Saumur, and Tours, but in particular in its world-famous castles, such as the Château de Chambord.

Criterion (ii): The Loire Valley is an outstanding cultural landscape along a major river which bears witness to an interchange of human values and to a harmonious development of interactions between human beings and their environment over two millennia.

Criterion (iv): The landscape of the Loire Valley, and more particularly its many cultural monuments, illustrate to an exceptional degree the ideals of the Renaissance and the Age of the Enlightenment on western European thought and design.

http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/933

If you plan a trip to the Loire Valley in France between Sully-sur Loire and Chalonnes, you can explore a UNESCO World Heritage Site with majestic castles with spectacular medieval architecture:

1. Villandry was built by the same man that designed much of Chambord (François I Finance Minister Jean Le Breton). Villandry is actually most renowned for what is outside of the castle. However, while Chambord remains Le Breton’s main achievement in construction, it is Villandry where he used all of the Renaissance gardening tricks he had picked up while working as an ambassador in Italy. The castle remained in the Le Breton family until the early 20th century, when it was purchased by Joachim Carvallo, who spent a whole of time, money and devotion to rebuilding, expanding and repairing the beautiful gardens. Today the gardens at Villandry are considered one of the best examples of Renaissance style gardens in the world and boasts a water garden, flower gardens and vegetable gardens laid out in formal patterns created with low box hedges—making it a must-see on any castle tour of the Loire.

2. Chambord is one of France’s most recognizable castles known for its distinct French Renaissance architecture, which blends late French Gothic and newer Italian Renaissance motifs. Chambord is also the largest castle in the Loire. Chambord was first built by King Francois I as a hunting lodge (I know you picture a hunting lodge as being more of a log cabin than a magnificent model of French Renaissance architecture, but it was a KING’S hunting lodge, after all).  Chambord has 440 rooms, 365 fireplaces and 84 staircases. It is most known for its façade, which through more than 800 sculpted columns was designed to look like the skyline of Constantinople, with 11 kinds of different towers and different types of chimneys. Chambord also has a double-helix staircase that serves as the centerpiece to the castle and was rumored to have been designed (or inspired) by Leonardo da Vinci during his time at nearby Clos de Luce.

4. Chenonceau is one of my favorite castles in the Loire Valley. Chennonceau was built in 1513 by Catherine Briçonnet and later embellished by Diane de Poitiers and Catherine de’ Medici, the Chateau de Chenonceau contains exquisite interiors and has idyllic gardens that look over River Cher.

Originally a small castle along the banks of the River Cher, the castle got its current design in the 16th century when it was seized by the crown for unpaid debts. In 1547, King Henri II offered the castle to his mistress, Diane de Poitiers. and she had Chenonceau’s  arched bridge built. It spans the river. She is also responsible for the gorgeous flower and vegetable gardens set in buttressed stone terraces.

Upon King Henri II’s death in 1559, his clearly bitter widow and regent Catherine de Medici had Poitiers expelled from the castle and she moved into the scenic spot herself, adding even more extensive gardens. Since then the castle was privately owned for years and even used as a make-shift hospital for soldiers during WWII; its gallery bridge’s southern door provided access to the unoccupied Free Zone while the castle’s main entrance was in the Nazi occupied zone. Chenonceau today is one of the most visited and popular of the Loire castles and its Renaissance architecture and well-lit gallery and beautiful gardens.

5. Amboise is perched up on a strategic point along the Loire River and was originally built as a fort. In 1434, the castle was seized by King Charles VII after its owner (from which the castle got its name), Louis Amboise, was convicted and killed for supposedly plotting against the King. In the 15th century that the castle was lavishly rebuilt and added onto, starting with its late French Gothic architecture, until Italian builders were brought in and the castle’s style changed to Renaissance.While the castle became a favorite retreat for many French Kings (King François I was raised primarily at the castle), Amboise’s most famous guest was Leonardo da Vinci, who came to the castle in 1515 as a guest of the King and stayed in nearby Clos de Luce. What is most notable about Amboise, however, is known for its unique blend of Gothic and Renaissance architecture and large formal garden.

6. Blois was always a favorite getaway town for French kings; the castle in this quaint little Loire town is best known as the birthplace of King Louis XII as well as the primary residence for Henri IV’s exiled wife Marie de Medici, and later for the Duke of Orléans (brother of Louis XIII and uncle of Louis XIV). However, the castle has a long and prominent history and its Renaissance architecture and picturesque spot along the banks of the Loire make it a definite worthwhile stop on your Loire castle tour. In fact, the castle was the main resort for the French court during the 16th century and was also the location for the famed States General meetings held by Henri III in 1576 and 1588, where several prominent nobles were sentenced to death. The castle also plays a role in the famous Three Musketeers series by Alexandre Dumas as an important retreat for some of France’s most famous and powerful kings.

7. Cheverny was also given to Diane de Poitiers by her lover, King Henri II. Chenonceau was her favorite and primary residence. Poitiers sold Château de Cheverny to the former owner’s son who had originally built the castle between 1624 and 1630. The castle passed between owners until 1914, when the owner made it the first castle to be opened to the public; the family still owns and operates the castle to this day. The castle is renowned for its beautiful interiors and collection of furniture, tapestries and rare objects d’art. There is also a pack of about 70 dogs that are kept on the grounds and taken out for hunts twice weekly.

8. Clos Lucé is not really a  “Château de la Loire”; it is a large mansion located just 500 meters from  the Château d’Amboise by way of an underground passageway and is notable mostly for its most famous resident, Leonardo da Vinci. In 1515, King François I invited the Italian painter and inventor to Amboise and offered him the manor to use as a home and studio. When Da Vinci arrived in 1516 he came with three paintings, including the famed Mona Lisa, and lived in the mansion for the last three years of his life. Visitors to Amboise should not hesitate to hop on over to Clos Lucé, where you can peruse a museum that includes forty models of various machines designed by Leonardo.

9. Langeais is a perfect example of Medieval French architecture. It is located near the Brittany frontier and had a significant role in the battle between the French and English. The structure dates back to the 10th century and was built on a cliff which offered a strategic location overlooking the Loire River. The castle was actually fortified and expanded under the rule of Richard I of England (when English kings ruled this region of France) until King Philippe II of France recaptured the castle in 1206. The castle was also where Anne of Brittany and King Charles VIII wed, thus uniting France and Brittany. Today, the dark and ominous looking castle is replete with a great collection of Medieval tapestries.

Château de Langeais

 

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Witness the Story of Easter in Rome: Buona Pasqua

c. 1580

c. 1580 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Master of the Tiburtine Sibyl Princeton

Master of the Tiburtine Sibyl Princeton (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Tiburtine Sybil, woodcut from the Nurember...

The Tiburtine Sybil, woodcut from the Nuremberg Chronicle Français : La Sibylle Tiburtine, bois gravé tiré de la Chronique de Nuremberg, feuille 93 verso (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The 12th Station of the Cross - Jesus dies on ...

Image via Wikipedia

A 14th-century of Jesus Christ bearing the cro...

A 14th-century of Jesus Christ bearing the cross, from the monastery in . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Italiano: La Sibilla Tiburtina, 1483, affresco...

Italiano: La Sibilla Tiburtina, 1483, affresco nella Chiesa di S. Giovanni Evangelista a Tivoli (Roma). L’immagine è racchiusa in un tondo e deliminata in un anello bianco con il basso l’espressione SIC AIT riferito alla profezia che viene riportata sotto il ritratto. La profezia inizia all’interno del medaglione per proseguire al di sotto di esso. The Tiburtine Sibyl, 1483. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Tiburtine sibyl and the Emperor Augustus i...

The Tiburtine sibyl and the Emperor Augustus is a 16th-century chiaroscuro woodcut by Antonio da Trento. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pope Francis and the Vatican gear up for Holy Week Celebrations and ancient traditions in and around Rome. These events commemorate the last week of the life of Jesus Christ before his painful death on the cross and ultimate Resurrection.

The Tiburtine Sybil named Albunea, told Emperor Augustus (27 BC-AD 14) in a mystic meeting, that the first-born of God would one day rule his empire: “Haec est ara primogeniti Dei”-This is the altar of the first-born of God.

Augustus commemorated the spot by erecting an altar. The church of Santa Maria in Aracoeli (altar of Heaven) now crowns the highest point of the Campidoglio in Rome with 124 steps that lead to the entrance of the church. In the church, the figures of Augustus and the Tiburtine Sibyl are painted on either side of the arch above the high altar.

English: Santa Maria in Aracoeli (façade), Rome.

English: Santa Maria in Aracoeli (façade), Rome. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Antonio da Trento, Tiburtine Sibyl and the Emp...

Antonio da Trento, Tiburtine Sibyl and the Emperor Augustus (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Inside this church are the relics of St. Helen in a porphyry urn. Saint Helena was the mother of Emperor Constantine who ultimately decreed the Christianization of pagan Rome. Inside the church, there is a chapel of the Santo Bambino. The Bambino is carved from olive wood from Jerusalem using wood from the Garden of Gethsemane. It was created by a Franciscan monk in the 15th century.

Furthermore, the Tiburtine Sibyl prophesied a final Emperor named Constan who would “vanquish the foes of Christianity and end paganism.” Michelangelo portrayed the Sibyls in the frescos of the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

The Tiburtine Sybil's prophecy to the Emperor ...

The Tiburtine Sybil’s prophecy to the Emperor Augustus (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Easter story of the “Passion of Christ” is depicted in the 14 “Stations of the Cross.” The “INRI” on the cross is the abbreviation of “King of the Jews” in Hebrew. During his lifetime, Jesus encountered the same type of pain that normal people excounter. He endured physical pain, mental anguish, rejection, abandonment and betrayal. Holy Week allows us to recall the great sacrifice that Jesus made for all of us and signifies new beginnings.

Holy Week is one of the most religious and exciting times of the year to visit Rome and many other towns in Italy and Spain http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZl_Ab29id4&NR=1. Holy Week events begin on Palm Sunday, also known as Passion Sunday. On this day, Jesus rode into Jerusalem on  a donkey and was welcomed as royalty with the path paved with branches and palms. The ceremonies during the week revolve around the story of the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Jesus Christ. On Palm Sunday,  Holy Week begins with the Pope‘s blessing of the palms in St. Peter’s Square.

The three days before Easter are called the Paschal Triduum of Death, Burial and Resurrection of the Lord http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcNFTNu1I4M. The Easter Vigil is the high point of the Triduum: “The night Jesus Christ broke the chains of death and rose triumphant from the grave.”  The church empties the Holy Water from the fonts on the days of the Sacred Paschal Triduum in preparation of the blessing of the water at the Easter Vigil. The Passion is read three times during Holy Week: Passion Sunday, Holy Thursday and Good Friday. The words of Jesus are always read by a priest.

On Holy Thursday (Maundy Thursday), the Pope performs a rare morning mass. “The Mass of the Chrism” is held in St. Peter’s Square when the oils are blessed and the Chrism is consecrated.  Chrism is a combination of balsam and oil and is used for annointing for occasions like confirmation and ordinations.

In the evening after sun-down, the Mass of the Lord’s Supper commemorates the institution of the Eucharist and the Last Supper of Jesus with the Apostles. This event includes a reading of Matthew’s account of the “Passion of Christ”; the narration of Jesus’ capture, suffering and death. It includes the representation of Jesus Christ washing the feet of his Disciples which was carried out by Pope Benedict at the Cathedral of St. John Lateran where he washed the feet of 12 priests http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngIUmGhwwqs.

On Good Friday, the day of Christ’s brutal crucufixion in AD33, choirs sing St. John’s version of Christ’s crucifixion. Peter Paul Rubens’ “Ecce Homo” (Behold the Man) portrays Christ with his “Crown of Thorns” before his Crucifixion. After his crucifixion, he was covered with a shroud http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dVQnkKlphY&feature=relmfu.

On this day in Catholic churches around the world, Christians glorify the cross in their individual parishes http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubkiKyjo9WU. The cross is venerated as a symbol of our faith by kneeling in front of the cross and kissing it. In this way, we honor the Lord’s Cross as an instrument of our salvation. The cross was the means of Jesus Christ’s execution and as a sign of victory over sin and death. The church does not celebrate the Liturgy of the Eucharist on Good Friday, rather the Church commemorates the Lord’s Passion.

In Rome on Good Friday, a solemn “Via Crucis Procession” (The Way of the Cross) involves an evening torch-lit procession that follows the Pope as he traces the Stations of the Cross from the Colosseum to Palatine Hill http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2qwjLTFcwQ. The church in Rome adopted the practice of “Adoration of the Cross” from the Church in Jerusalem where a fragment of wood believed to be the Lord’s cross has been venerated every year on Good Friday since the fouth century http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8eDPyXYv50.

St. Helen, the mother of emperor Constantine, discovered this fragment of wood on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 326. Pope Alexander VII had the top of the obelisk in St. Peter’s Square adorned with his insignia. There is a relic of Christ’s “True Cross” encased in this emblem of Pope Alexander that crowns the Obelisk.

Jesus had 12 disciples. They were pupils or followers of Christ. The Passion of Christ was initiated when the Temple Guards, guided by Judas Iscario, captured Jesus. Judas was a Disciple of Jesus who betrayed him by telling the guards that whomever he kisses, they should arrest. Judas was paid in silver for his betrayal which is portrayed  in “The Kiss of Judas.” The trial and painful crucifixion of Jesus ensued. Judas ended up returning the silver and committing suicide.

On the Joseph Maria Subirachs “Magic Square” on the facade of Gaudi’s Sagada Familia in Barcelona (Quadrato magico di Sagrada Familia) next to “The Kiss of Judas” in the picture below, notice that all colums, diagonals and rows add up to 33, the year of the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

Judas Betrayed Jesus Christ before his Crucifixion

Judas Kiss and the Magic Square of 33

Pictured above is Caravaggio’s famous portrayal of “The Kiss of Judas.”

On Holy Saturday, Jesus’  lifeless body was cradled in the arms of  Mary, as portrayed in Michelangelo’s “Pieta.”  He was then laid to rest in the borrowed grave of a friend. Churches around the world conduct an Easter Vigil where we celebrate Jesus Christ; our light who drives away the darkness of our lives http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3d9LTi_U2w&feature=relmfu. At the beginning of the Easter Vigil, the church is darkened and gradually springs to life with the Ressurection of the Lord as faithful parishoners light candles inside the church. The Easter Vigil service includes the Service of Light, the Blessing of the Fire and the Preparation of the Paschal Candle and Procession.

The gloomy darkness of Good Friday is followed by the joyful celebration of trumpets at Easter which “dispels all evil, washes guilt away, restores lost innocence, brings mourners joy, casts out hatred, brings us peace and humbles earthly pride” (Paschal Praeconium, the Exsultet). Easter Sunday celebrates the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. His Ascension into Heaven is the 40th day after Easter. On Easter Sunday, Pope Benedict delivers his blessing “Urbi et Orbi” (to the city and to the world) in St. Peter’s Square http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5axrSsEU_U0&feature=related.

In the picture below, Jesus Christ is ascending into Heaven above the altar of Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia in Barcelona Spain. The term apostle came into use after the Ascension of Jesus Christ when the disciples (followers) who had witnessed his resurrection, became apostles (ambassadors of the Gospel: evangelists and teachers). The true apostolic age ended when the last apostle died in about 100AD.

Gaudi's Sagrada Familia in Barcelona Spain

The Pope delivers several messages to faithful pilgrims between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBwIefKXY0s.

Here was the 2011 Easter Message in Italian http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0mEEVTPU2I

Happy Easter and have a wonderful Vino con Vista celebration with your family and friends!

 

Learn more about Rome  @ www.vino-con-vista.com.

 

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The Easter Story: Paschal Triduum of Death, Burial and Resurrection

Mosaic (Jesus) from Hagia Sophia

Mosaic (Jesus) from Hagia Sophia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Português: Mosaico do Portão Imperial em Hagia...

Português: Mosaico do Portão Imperial em Hagia Sophia. Ajoelhado à direita do Cristo Pantocrator está o imperador bizantino Leão VI. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A 14th-century of Jesus Christ bearin...

English: A 14th-century of Jesus Christ bearing the cross, from the monastery in . (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Beginning of 11th century

Beginning of 11th century (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bishop John washes the feet of Eleanor, who wa...

Bishop John washes the feet of Eleanor, who walks to St. Giles, Wrexham, in bare feet, on Maundy Thursday 2007. Photograph by Brian Roberts, Wrexham (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Christ washing the feet of the Apostl...

English: Christ washing the feet of the Apostles. Icon of Pskov school. Русский: Омовение ног (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Christ icon in Taizé

Christ icon in Taizé (Photo credit: lgambett)

Français : Christ en Croix d'Agnolo Allori, di...

Français : Christ en Croix d’Agnolo Allori, dit Bronzino, vers 1545, huile sur panneau, 145 x 115 cm, Musée des beaux-arts de Nice, France. Italiano: Cristo in croce di Agnolo Allori, detto Bronzino, circa 1545, olio su legno, 145 x 115 cm, Museo di belle-arti di Nizza, Francia. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Jesus Christ - detail from Deesis mos...

English: Jesus Christ – detail from Deesis mosaic, Hagia Sophia, Istanbul (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The three days before Easter are called the Paschal Triduum of Death, Burial and Resurrection of the Lord http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WcNFTNu1I4M.

This is a three day liturgical celebration. The liturgy held on the evening of Maundy Thursday initiates the Easter Triduum. This period includes Good Friday, Holy Saturday and ends Easter.

The Easter Vigil is the high point of the Triduum: “The night Jesus Christ broke the chains of death and rose triumphant from the grave.”  The church empties the Holy Water from the fonts on the days of the Sacred Paschal Triduum in preparation of the blessing of the water at the Easter Vigil. The Passion is read three times during Holy Week: Passion Sunday, Holy Thursday and Good Friday. The words of Jesus are always read by a priest.

The Holy Seapulchre Church, Jerusalem. Catholi...

The Holy Seapulchre Church, Jerusalem. Catholic Holy Mass on Maundy Thursday / Crkva Svetoga groba u Jeruzalemu. Katolička sveta misa na Veliki četvrtak. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Icon of Jesus Christ

English: Icon of Jesus Christ (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On Holy Thursday (Maundy Thursday), the Pope performs a rare morning mass. “The Mass of the Chrism” is held in St. Peter’s Square when the oils are blessed and the Chrism is consecrated.  Chrism is a combination of balsam and oil and is used for annointing for occasions like confirmation and ordinations.

In the evening after sun-down, the Mass of the Lord’s Supper commemorates the institution of the Eucharist and the Last Supper of Jesus with the Apostles. This event includes a reading of Matthew’s account of the “Passion of Christ“; the narration of Jesus’ capture, suffering and death. It includes the representation of Jesus Christ washing the feet of his Disciples which was carried out by Pope Benedict at the Cathedral of St. John Lateran where he washed the feet of 12 priests http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngIUmGhwwqs.

Deposition of Christ, 1507, drawing from Roman...

Deposition of Christ, 1507, drawing from Roman sarcophagi. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On Good Friday, the day of Christ’s brutal crucufixion in AD 33, choirs sing St. John’s version of Christ’s crucifixion. Peter Paul Rubens’ “Ecce Homo” (Behold the Man) portrays Christ with his “Crown of Thorns” before his Crucifixion. After his crucifixion, he was covered with a shroud http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dVQnkKlphY&feature=relmfu.

English: Mosaic in baptistery of San Marco - &...

English: Mosaic in baptistery of San Marco – “Crucifixion of Jesus Christ” Русский: Мозаика баптистерия базилики Сан Марко – “Распятие Христово” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On this day in Catholic churches around the world, Christians glorify the cross in their individual parishes http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ubkiKyjo9WU. The cross is venerated as a symbol of our faith by kneeling in front of the cross and kissing it. In this way, we honor the Lord’s Cross as an instrument of our salvation. The cross was the means of Jesus Christ’s execution and as a sign of victory over sin and death. The church does not celebrate the Liturgy of the Eucharist on Good Friday, rather the Church commemorates the Lord’s Passion.

Jesus helped by Simon of Cyrene, part of a ser...

Jesus helped by Simon of Cyrene, part of a series depicting the stations of the Cross. Chapel Nosso Senhor dos Passos, Santa Casa de Misericórdia of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Oil on canvas, XIXth century, unknown author. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In Rome on Good Friday, a solemn “Via Crucis Procession” (The Way of the Cross) involves an evening torch-lit procession that follows the Pope as he traces the Stations of the Cross from the Colosseum to Palatine Hill http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2qwjLTFcwQ. The church in Rome adopted the practice of “Adoration of the Cross” from the Church in Jerusalem where a fragment of wood believed to be the Lord’s cross has been venerated every year on Good Friday since the fouth century http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8eDPyXYv50.

St. Helen, the mother of emperor Constantine, discovered this fragment of wood on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 326. Pope Alexander VII had the top of the obelisk in St. Peter’s Square adorned with his insignia. There is a relic of Christ’s “True Cross” encased in this emblem of Pope Alexander that crowns the Obelisk.

Jesus had 12 disciples. They were pupils or followers of Christ. The Passion of Christ was initiated when the Temple Guards, guided by Judas Iscario, captured Jesus. Judas was a Disciple of Jesus who betrayed him by telling the guards that whomever he kisses, they should arrest. Judas was paid in silver for his betrayal which is portrayed  in “The Kiss of Judas.” The trial and painful crucifixion of Jesus ensued. Judas ended up returning the silver and committing suicide.

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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Chicago Holy Name Cathedral Holy Week and Easter Schedule 2017

English: Roman Catholic monks of the preparing...

English: Roman Catholic monks of the preparing to light the Christ candle prior to mass]] at St. Mary’s Abbey in (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Christ washing the feet of the Apostl...

English: Christ washing the feet of the Apostles. Icon of Pskov school. Русский: Омовение ног (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Christ Washing the Feet of the Apostles by Mei...

Christ Washing the Feet of the Apostles by Meister des Hausbuches, 1475 (Gemäldegalerie, Berlin). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“During Holy Week the Church celebrates the mysteries of salvation accomplished by Christ in the last days of his life on earth, beginning with his messianic entrance into Jerusalem.”

Stations of the Cross

April 14 @ 3:00 pm4:00 pm

Good Friday – Lord’s Passion

April 14 @ 5:15 pm6:30 pm

Easter Vigil

April 15 @ 8:00 pm10:30 pm

Cardinal Cupich will be the main celebrant for the Easter Vigil.

Easter Sunday Mass Schedule

Sunday, April 16 – Easter Sunday 6:30 AM – Rev. John Boivin 8:00 AM – Msgr. Michael Boland 9:30 AM – Very Rev. Gregory Sakowicz 9:45 AM – Rev. Louis Cameli (Auditorium) 11:15 AM – Rev. Bradley Zamora 11:30 AM – Rev. William Moriarity (Auditorium) 1:00 PM – Rev. Don Cambe 5:15 PM – Rev. […]

 

 

For more information visit www.holynamecathedral.org

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

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Vino con Vista UNESCO Sites in France

Vincent van Gogh's Bedroom in Arles.

Vincent van Gogh’s Bedroom in Arles. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Walls of the Roman arena in Arles

English: Walls of the Roman arena in Arles (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Saint-Émilion

Saint-Émilion (Photo credit: quintendusaer)

Chartres Cathedral

Chartres Cathedral (Photo credit: Joe Shlabotnik)

English: Sunset over the bay of Mont Saint-Mic...

English: Sunset over the bay of Mont Saint-Michel Français : Coucher de Soleil sur la baie du Mont-Saint-Michel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Le pont du Gard

Le pont du Gard (Photo credit: Antonio Cinotti )

Abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel, Manche, Normandie,...

Abbey of Mont-Saint-Michel, Manche, Normandie, France. The cloister. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pont du Gard in France is a Roman aqueduct bui...

Pont du Gard in France is a Roman aqueduct built in c. 19 BC. It is a World Heritage Site. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Put these magnificent French Vino con Vista UNESCO sites on your bucket list:

English: Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy (Manche...

English: Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy (Manche), France at night. Français : Le Mont Saint-Michel dans la Manche (Normandie, France), vu de nuit. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Here’s my Pinterest Boards showing UNESCO Sites in France

Amphitheater in Arles, France

Amphitheater in Arles, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

http://www.pinterest.com/vinoconvista/france-s-unesco-world-heritage-sites/

Here’s an interactive map of all UNESCO sites in the World:

http://whc.unesco.org/en/interactive-map/

    • vitrail de la cathédrale de Chartres

      vitrail de la cathédrale de Chartres (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

      Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

 

 

 

 

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Pont du Gard is a Vino con Vista UNESCO Site in France

English: Arena in Nîmes (Gard, France).

English: Arena in Nîmes (Gard, France). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Exploring Nimes

Exploring Nimes (Photo credit: Stuck in Customs)

Nimes Coliseum Bullfighter

Geographical map of the aqueduct of the Pont d...

Geographical map of the aqueduct of the Pont du Gard. Map created using data from OpenStreetMap. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: The Pont du Gard is an aqueduct in th...

English: The Pont du Gard is an aqueduct in the South of France constructed by the Roman Empire, and located in Vers-Pont-du-Gard near Remoulins, in the Gard département. Nederlands: De Pont du Gard is een Romeins aquaduct dat later is uitgebreid tot brug. Het bouwwerk ligt iets ten zuiden van het plaatsje Vers-Pont-du-Gard in Frankrijk, niet ver van Nîmes en Uzès, en staat op de Werelderfgoedlijst van UNESCO. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Pont du Gard is a 31 mile limestone aqueduct built by the Romans during the reign of Emperor Cladius. The Romans built this system of canals to bring fresh water to Nimes ancient citizens from the springs at Uzes. The Romans established a colony in Nimes in 30 B.C. where you can admire the Romam amphitheater and temple. The aqueduct

Nîmes

Nîmes (Photo credit: Wolfgang Staudt)

stretches over the Gard river between Uzes and Nimes. Uze was a famous textile town.

It is located in Vers-Pont-du-Gard commune in the South of France. It was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1985. It is one of the most popular tourist sites in France. There is a museum that offers a short film about the Romans.

 

The famous aqueduct was constructed by the Roman Empire in the mid first century under Emperor Cladius. , before the dawn of the Christian era. The bridge is almost 164 feet high  and has 3 levels. The the longest level is 902 feet long. The bottom tier of the structure is a walkway. In 1285, the bishop of Uzes mandatated a toll-collection process from all travelers crossing the bridge. The third level carries a water conduit.

The Pont du Gard is currently one of the most visited attractions in all of France. For more information visit: www.pontdugard.fr

Here’s the UNESCO link: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/344

Here’s a video: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/344/video

Dr. EveAnn Lovero writes Travel Guides @ www.vino-con-vista.com

Pont du Gard

Pont du Gard (Photo credit: dkilim)

 

 

 

Pont du Gard / ポン・デュ・ガール

Pont du Gard / ポン・デュ・ガール (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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